CONTINUE READING

10 Interesting Uses Of Tea Bags You Probably Didn't Know

Share this with a friend

Your Name
Recipient Email
Subject
Message

by
6 Min Read

10 Interesting Uses Of Tea bags

Besides brewing a refreshing cup of tea, a tea bag can also be used topically as a tincture or poultice for minor cuts and burns, insect bites, baggy eyes, or as a mild astringent to tone your skin. Studies suggest that applying warm tea bags to canker sores, pus-filled pimples or boils can help them drain, heal speedily. Thanks to their ability to reduce inflammation, relieve pain.

Don’t you just love sitting down with a cup of hot tea after a long hard day? It can instantly pick you up! But tea doesn’t just energize you, it’s also rich in antioxidants that fight free radicals and protects against conditions like heart disease and cancer.

Tea can also accommodate a range of tastes as it comes with unique flavors – the fermented black tea, partially fermented oolong tea, and unfermented green tea. No wonder that it’s the second most popular drink in the world after water.

But if you thought that a tea bag is only meant for brewing tea, you’d be wrong. Here are a few interesting things that the ordinary tea bag can do for you.

1. Soothe A Sunburn

The UV rays of the sun can damage your skin, and over exposure to the sun can leave you with sore, red, sunburnt skin. Applying a wet tea bag to the affected area can soothe your sunburn.

According to research, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a compound found in green tea works as a sunscreen and can reduce DNA damage due to UV radiation. And animal studies have found that topical application of green tea can reduce the formation of cancerous skin cells. 1

2. Treat Acne

Pus-filled pimples can not only make you feel self conscious but also be painful. But don’t worry! The antioxidant and antimicrobial properties in green tea can zap that zit.

A study made people with mild-to-moderate acne apply a lotion with 2% green tea twice daily for a period of 6 weeks. They saw a reduction of 58.33% in the number of pimples on average. So applying a wet green tea bag to your pimples might be a good idea to clear your skin.2

3. Soothe Nicks And Insect Bites

Tea has antimicrobial and astringent properties. Whether you’re looking to soothe an insect bite or a tiny nick in your skin, pressing a damp tea bag against the irritated skin can reduce inflammation and protect against infection. 3

4. Help With Canker Sores

Canker sores are common among children and can be really painful. Apply a warm wet tea bag to the sore for 5 to 10 minutes and let the tannins in the tea work their magic by soothing the inflammation and pain.4

5. Deal With Oily Skin

One study observed that when a formulation containing 3% green tea extract was applied on the cheeks of participants for a period of 8 weeks, the production of skin oil significantly reduced. Researchers have suggested that certain compounds in green tea (α-linolenic acid and epigallocatechin gallate) work by inhibiting the activity of an enzyme (known as 5α-reductase) in your oil glands.5

So if you have oily skin, try patting your face with a wet green tea bag.

6. Soothe Tired Eyes And Dark Circles

Are late nights and stress leaving a mark on your eyes? Soak a couple of tea bags in warm water, squeeze out the extra moisture, and rest them over your closed eyes for 20 minutes. The tannins in the tea will relieve puffiness and refresh tired eyes. 6

7. Deal With Boils

Applying a moist tea bag to a boil can help it drain and heal. The tannins in tea have antibacterial properties and can work against infection. They also reduce inflammation and relieve pain.7

8. Tone Your Skin

The tannins react with proteins to tighten your skin pores. So if you’re looking for a mild astringent skin toner, a moist tea bag is an effective and inexpensive remedy.8

Peppermint is another herb that has a refreshing, anti-inflammatory effect on your skin. So a mixture of peppermint and green tea can be particularly helpful. A wet tea bag with both these herbs works as a soothing, cooling, and protective toner, especially during summer. 9

9. Spruce Up Your House

Did you know that tea bags can also help with housekeeping? A wet tea bag can get rid of greasy fingerprints from glass and make your windows and mirrors sparkle.

But that’s not all. The tannins in black tea also help color and shine wooden furniture, so you can use a wet tea bag to wipe down your chairs and tables.

You can also leave a couple of tea bags in your fridge to absorb odors so that you don’t get any nasty smells when you open your refrigerator.10

10. Grow Your Garden

Toss used tea bags into your compost piles or around shrubs and perennials to give them a nutrient boost. The tea will decompose releasing the much-needed nitrogen for your plants. Flowering plants that need a lot of nutrients will be particularly appreciative.11

References   [ + ]

1. Korać, Radava R., and Kapil M. Khambholja. “Potential of herbs in skin protection from ultraviolet radiation.” Pharmacognosy reviews 5, no. 10 (2011): 164.
2. Elsaie, Mohamed L., Mahmoud F. Abdelhamid, Lotfy T. Elsaaiee, and Hanaa M. Emam. “The efficacy of topical 2% green tea lotion in mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris.” Journal of drugs in dermatology: JDD 8, no. 4 (2009): 358-364.
3, 4, 6, 7. Green, Joey. Joey Green’s Magic Health Remedies: 1,363 Quick-and-easy Cures Using Brand-name Products. Rodale, 2013.
5. Mahmood, Tariq, Naveed Akhtar, Barkat Ali Khan, Haji M. Shoaib Khan, and Tariq Saeed. “Outcomes of 3% green tea emulsion on skin sebum production in male volunteers.” Bosn J Basic Med Sci 10, no. 3 (2010): 260-264.
8. Balick, Michael. Rodale’s 21st-Century Herbal: A Practical Guide for Healthy Living Using Nature’s Most Powerful Plants. Rodale, 2014.
9. Robson, Michelle, and Michelle Robson-Garth. The Everything Guide to Spices for Health: A Complete Guide to the Natural Health-boosting Benefits of Everyday Spices. ” F+ W Media, Inc.”, 2015.
10. Woodward, R. J. Generations of Family Favourites – Soup 2 Nuts. iUniverse, 2011.
11. Yankee Magazine. Yankee Magazine’s Panty Hose, Hot Peppers, Tea Bags, and More–For the Garden: 1,001 Ingenious Ways to Use Common Household Items to Control Weeds, Beat Pests, Cook Compost, Solve Problems, Make Tricky Jobs Easy, and Save Time. Rodale, 2006.