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Does Sleeping In The Afternoon Make You Fat?

Does taking an afternoon sleep makes you fat?

Does taking an afternoon sleep makes you fat?

Does Sleeping Make You Fat?

Your lifestyle and genetics determine your ability to gain or lose weight as well as a lower energy-intake to energy-expenditure ratio (energy balance equation). Multiple studies have concluded that sleeping in itself cannot cause weight gain. Our bodies are expending energy even while asleep to fuel the complex processes required to grow, maintain, repair and survive.

Your lifestyle and genetics determine your ability to gain or lose weight as well as a lower energy-intake to the energy-expenditure ratio (energy balance equation).

Sleeping Doesn’t Make You Fat

Multiple studies have concluded that sleeping in itself cannot cause weight gain. Our bodies are expending energy even while asleep to fuel the complex processes required to grow, maintain, repair, and survive.1 In fact, sleep deprivation or working late nights is one of the major reasons for weight gain. Lack of sleep leads to your body slowing down production of hormones, leptin, and ghrelin, making you feel hungry, even after eating a filling meal.2

30 Mins Of Nap In The Afternoon Is Beneficial

Studies have found that people who slept for no more than 30 minutes in the afternoon had a lower incidence of obesity as compared to those who didn’t.3 Additionally, experts suggest that a nap of not more than 30 mins in the afternoon can negate the production of cortisol (the stress hormone) and also increase the productivity of workers as well as the learning capacity of people in the latter part of the day.4 Most people with late shifts are required to take a short afternoon nap to avoid accidents or mishaps at work at night.5

Do Not Sleep Within 1–2 Hrs Of Lunch

Avoid sleeping within 1-2 hours of lunch to prevent slowing down the digestion process and increasing the chances of acid reflux due to your horizontal posture. So keep it short and space it appropriately post lunch.6

References   [ + ]

1. ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY EXPENDITURE. The University Of Michigan.
2. Sleep Deprivation and Obesity. Harvard T.H. Chan.
3. Sayón-Orea, Carmen, Maira Bes-Rastrollo, Silvia Carlos, Juan Jose Beunza, Francisco J. Basterra-Gortari, and Miguel A. Martínez-González. “Association between sleeping hours and siesta and the risk of obesity: the SUN Mediterranean Cohort.” Obesity facts 6, no. 4 (2013): 337-347.
4. An afternoon nap markedly boosts the brain’s learning capacity. The University of California, Berkeley.
5. Repaying your sleep debt. Harvard Health Publishing.
6. Napping may not be such a no-no. Harvard Health Publishing.

Disclaimer: The content is purely informative and educational in nature and should not be construed as medical advice. Please use the content only in consultation with an appropriate certified medical or healthcare professional.