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9 Exercises To Heal De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is a painful condition that affects the tendons in your wrist. It occurs when the 2 tendons around the base of your thumb become swollen. The swelling causes the sheaths (casings) covering the tendons to become inflamed. This puts pressure on nearby nerves, causing pain and numbness.

Doctors are not sure why someone has De Quervain’s tenosynovitis. It can happen because of overuse, a direct blow to the thumb, repetitive grasping, and certain inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. The onset is often gradual and pain is made worse by movement of the thumb and wrist, and may radiate to the thumb or the forearm.

Exercises For De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

There are many different treatment options for De Quervain’s tenosynovitis like taking anti-inflammatory medication or surgery in severe cases. You can also explore physical therapy as an option to reduce pain and swelling. Here are 9 simple exercises to help cure this condition. Make sure you consult with your doctor before starting any form of therapy.

1. Wrist Flexion

Extend your arm with your palm facing up.
Hold a small weight in your hand and lift your wrist upward. You’ll feel a stretch at the back of your hand.
Slowly lower your wrist down to return the weight to its original position.
Do two sets of 15.
As you get stronger, you can gradually increase the weight.

2. Opposition Stretch

Place your hand on a table with your palm facing up.
Lift your thumb and your pinky.
Gently press the tips of your thumb and pinky together. You’ll feel a stretch at the base of your thumb.
Hold this position for 6 seconds.
Release and repeat 10 times.

3. Thumb Flexion

Hold your hand in front of you as though you were going to shake someone’s hand. You can rest it on a table for support.
Use your other hand to bend your thumb down at the base of the thumb where it connects to the palm. You’ll feel a stretch at the base of your thumb and the inside of your wrist.
Hold for at least 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 5 to 10 times.

4. Finkelstein Stretch

Extend your arm in front of you as though you’re about to shake someone’s hand.
Bend your thumb across your palm.
Use your opposite hand to gently stretch your thumb and wrist down. You’ll feel a stretch on the thumb side of your wrist.
Hold for at least 15 to 30 seconds.
Repeat two to four times.

5. Finger Spring

Place a rubber band or hair tie around your thumb and fingers. Make sure the band is tight enough to offer some resistance.
Open your thumb to stretch the rubber band as far as you can. You’ll feel a stretch along your thumb.
Do two sets of 15.

6. Wrist Extension

Extend your arm with your palm facing down.
Hold a small weight as you slowly bend your wrist up and back. You’ll feel a stretch at the back of your hand and wrist.
Slowly bring your wrist back to the original position.
Do two sets of 15.
You can gradually increase the weight as you gain strength.

7. Thumb Lifts

Place your hand on a flat surface with your palm facing up.
Rest the tip of your thumb at the base of your fourth finger.
Lift your thumb away from your palm so it’s nearly perpendicular to the forefinger side of your hand. You’ll feel a stretch at the back of your thumb and across your palm.
Keep your thumb extended for about 6 seconds and release.
Repeat 8 to 12 times.

8. Resisted Ulnar Deviation

Sit on a chair with your legs spread slightly open.
Grasp one end of an elastic band with your right hand.
Lean forward, put your right elbow on your right thigh, and let your forearm drop down between your knees.
Using your left foot, step on the other end of the elastic band.
With your palm facing down, slowly bend your right wrist to the side away from your left knee. You’ll feel a stretch at the back and the inside of your hand.
Repeat 8 to 12 times.
Repeat this exercise on your left hand.

9. Wrist Radial Deviation Strengthening

Extend your arm in front of you, palm facing inward, while holding a weight. Your thumb should be on top. Balance your forearm on a table and with your wrist positioned over the edge if you need extra support.
Keeping your forearm still, gently bend your wrist up, with the thumb moving up toward the ceiling. You’ll feel a stretch at the base of your thumb where it meets your wrist.
Slowly lower your arm back down to the original position.
Do two sets of 15.

Disclaimer: The content is purely informative and educational in nature and should not be construed as medical advice. Please use the content only in consultation with an appropriate certified medical or healthcare professional.

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