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Can Kidney Issues Cause Premature Ejaculation?

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Ejaculatory disorders such as premature ejaculation (PE) are considered the most common types of sexual dysfunction in men. There is limited literature on sexual problems in chronic kidney disease patients. Male sexual dysfunction in CKD includes decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, premature or delayed ejaculation, and difficulty in achieving orgasm.

Curejoy Expert Dipti Mothay Explains:

Ejaculatory disorders such as premature ejaculation (PE) are considered the most common types of sexual dysfunction in men.

“The inability to achieve or maintain an erection sufficient for satisfactory sexual performance,” is a commonly accepted definition of impotence by the National Institutes of Health; however it is now recognized by the American Urological Association (AUA) as Ejaculatory disorders (ED).ED reportedly affects up to 40% of men between the ages of 40 and 70 and is more likely to develop with aging. Although the problem is often assumed to be psychological, biology also may play a role.

Premature ejaculation

Medically, the most persistent form of premature ejaculation is defined by the presence of the following three problems ever since starting to have sex:

– Ejaculation always, or nearly always, happening before sexual penetration has been achieved, or within about a minute of penetration.
– Negative personal consequences, such as distress and frustration, or avoidance of sexual intimacy.

Premature ejaculation in chronic kidney disease:

There is limited literature on sexual problems (other than fertility related) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Male sexual dysfunction in CKD includes decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, premature or delayed ejaculation, and difficulty in achieving orgasm.

Erectile dysfunction in chronic kidney disease is multifactorial and includes decreased arterial blood flow, venous leakage due to shunts, altered penile smooth muscle function, hormonal disturbances, side effect of medications, and neurogenic dysfunction. The etiological factors are often classified into organic and psychological causes; however, the two factors are interwoven.

Erectile dysfunction can be seen in up to 40–80% of hemodialysis patients. Thirty-three percent patients report no sexual activity and 44% report only one sexual activity per week. Although psychological factor plays an important role, effective renal replacement therapy improves fitness, libido, and potency.