How To Use Caffeine For Hair Loss: Spilling The Beans

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How To Use Caffeine For Hair Loss

Studies have found that caffeine can boost hair growth and prevent alopecia or male pattern baldness. Caffeine does this by preventing testosterone from suppressing hair shaft production, penetrating through hair follicles and improving barrier function, among other things.

Everybody loves a head full of hair. It’s no surprise then that the market is flooded with various oils and shampoos offering different technologies and formulae for quick and luscious hair growth. The latest one doing the rounds is caffeine shampoos. While there hasn’t been many studies about the effect of caffeine on hair, some evidence does suggest that this stimulant also manages to stimulate hair growth, especially in men.

Caffeine Prevents Hair Loss And Helps Hair Growth

Ever heard of androgenetic alopecia or simply alopecia? Also called male-pattern baldness, it is a scalp condition more common among men than women. Here, hair is lost in a definite pattern, beginning above the temples. Caffeine is found to be a good remedy for this.

A study show that caffeine works against alopecia at many levels, especially in men:

  • It inhibits phosphodiesterase, an enzyme that plays a crucial role in alopecia.
  • It reduces transepidermal water loss and increases barrier function of the skin.
  • It can penetrate well through follicles and can actively promote hair growth.1
  • It works against the suppression of hair shaft production by testosterone in male hair follicles.2

How To Use Caffeine On Hair?

Now that we are convinced that caffeine can support hair growth, the next obvious question would be: how do we use it? Well, a caffeine-based shampoo would be the first and the easiest way. But if you do not trust the chemicals in commercially available shampoos and are looking at more natural ways to do it, there are certain ways to do it. These ways are not scientifically proven but are supported well enough with positive user reviews. Since the most easily available caffeine source is coffee, here are some ways to use it for hair growth.

  • Coffee Mask: Make a paste with powdered coffee and olive oil. Apply the mixture to the scalp, leave it on for 20 minutes before washing your hair with a mild shampoo.
  • Coffee Hair Rinse: While you brew your morning coffee, keep some aside for a hair rinse. Rinse your hair with coffee while having a bath.
  • Coffee Oil: One way to give your scalp and hair a steady supply of caffeine is to prepare a coffee-based oil and use it regularly. For this, you need to blend 2 cups of your favorite oil (coconut/olive/almond) with ¼th a cup of roasted whole coffee bean until they are blended. This needs to be cooked over low heat for about 6–8 hours, making sure it doesn’t burn. After that, strain the oil enough number of times to remove the beans completely.

Some Side Effects

A word of caution though. Regular use of coffee on the hair can alter the color of your hair strands. While black, dark brown, and gray hair strands could turn darker, even a shade of orange, the lighter shades of hair like light brown or blond could turn darker. You should be okay with that. And also a whiff of coffee following you everywhere.

References   [ + ]

1.Bansal, Manish, Kajal Manchanda, and Shyam Sunder Pandey. “Role of caffeine in the management of androgenetic alopecia.” International journal of trichology 4, no. 3 (2012): 185.
2.Fischer, T. W., E. Herczeg‐Lisztes, W. Funk, D. Zillikens, Tamás Bíró, and R. Paus. “Differential effects of caffeine on hair shaft elongation, matrix and outer root sheath keratinocyte proliferation, and transforming growth factor‐β2/insulin‐like growth factor‐1‐mediated regulation of the hair cycle in male and female human hair follicles in vitro.” British Journal of Dermatology 171, no. 5 (2014): 1031-1043.

Disclaimer: The content is purely informative and educational in nature and should not be construed as medical advice. Please use the content only in consultation with an appropriate certified medical or healthcare professional.

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