Benefits Of Waking Up Early

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Benefits Of Waking Up Early

Early risers have always said they had an edge over those who slept in and started their day late. Research is now the wind in the sails of this argument. With health benefits to your cardiovascular system and positive effects on your mood, productivity levels, energy levels, and overall fitness, being a “lark” may be just what the doctor ordered.

If you’ve always been skeptical about that “early bird gets the worm” theory, what you will read now should lay any doubts to rest. Waking up early in the morning doesn’t just mean getting more out of your day, but could also reflect well on your health!

Here are some of the advantages to look forward to. They range from improved performance at studies or work, lower risk of obesity and certain psychological ailments, and even just feeling more energetic and positive in general.

Benefits Of Waking Up Early

1. Experience A Greater Degree Of Proactiveness

If you wake up early in the morning, you are likelier to be proactive. Researchers define proactiveness as the “willingness and ability to take action to change a situation to one’s advantage.” So an early riser is more likely to plan long-term goals for themselves and make things happen.1 The drive to bring this change is greater than in someone who rises late or is an evening person.

2. Feel More Satisfaction, Happiness, And Positivity

Waking up early is linked to greater positive feelings. Morning people or larks have greater “positive affect,” say researchers.2 Studies show a significant positive correlation between being a morning person and satisfaction and happiness – which simply means larks are more likely to be satisfied with their lives and be happier in general.3

3. Lead A Less Sedentary Life

Studies have found that waking up early might make you more active than those who wake up later. According to another study, night owls tend to be more sedentary and less inclined to fitness than early risers.4 This applies even to children! One study found that children who slept late and woke up late were more exhausted and sedentary than those who woke earlier.5

4. Maintain A Healthy Weight And Be Healthier

Night owls are also at risk of greater weight gain. According to one study, sleeping late can cause you to consume more calories toward the end of the day. Those who sleep late also tend to eat less fruit and vegetables and indulge in more fast food than the average early risers. Being a night owl has also been found to increase the risk of obesity as well as other disorders and also predisposes you to weight gain. Not a surprise considering you may not have the time to exercise if you have a busy life and are occupied late into the evening. On the other hand, if you wake up early, you’ll find it’s a great time to exercise free of distraction. Even if you can fit in a refreshing half-hour walk outdoors, yoga, or a quick workout at home or the gym, you’ll do your body a world of good. Night birds, as opposed to early risers, tended to be more at risk of cardiovascular problems and gastrointestinal disorders as well as cerebrovascular ailments.6

5. Score Better Grades

You may do better with certain tasks if you wake up early. In one study, university students who labeled themselves early risers or “morning people” had better grades than those who woke up later.7

6. Face A Lower Chance Of Depression And Psychological Ailments

Late rising linked to “eveningness” as opposed to “morningness” has been shown to be linked to raised risk of bulimic behavior, depression, and seasonal affective disorder (SAD).8 Reduce your risk with some early morning perspective.

7. Feel More Healthy!

Rising early isn’t just linked to your actual health but to how you feel about yourself. It may actually make you feel you are leading a more healthy life! As one study found, those who slept early and woke up early in the morning had higher self-assessed health ratings.9 With a better perception of yourself as far as health is concerned, you might even be more motivated to stay healthy and keep up the good work!

Benefits Of Waking Up Early According To Ayurveda

Ayurveda has long recognized the advantages of rising early. If you wake up late, you are likely to rise during the part of the day linked to kapha – sluggishness and heaviness – and this will reflect on how you feel during the day. By waking up early, you can rise when your energy levels are better and ease into the day without having to battle this sluggish feeling.10

For those who are particular about doing it right, the recommended or optimal time to wake up, according to Ayurvedic principles, is approximately an hour and a half before sunrise. This is said to help your body’s natural rhythms to align properly, just as nature intended.11

References   [ + ]

1.Randler, Christoph. “Proactive People Are Morning People1.” Journal of Applied Social Psychology 39, no. 12 (2009): 2787-2797.
2.Biss, Renée K., and Lynn Hasher. “Happy as a lark: Morning-type younger and older adults are higher in positive affect.” Emotion 12, no. 3 (2012): 437.
3, 8.Randler, Christoph. “Morningness–eveningness and satisfaction with life.” Social Indicators Research 86, no. 2 (2008): 297-302.
4.Night owls may be more sedentary, less motivated to exercise. American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
5.Kohyama, Jun. “Early rising children are more active than late risers.” Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment 2007 (2007): 959.
6.Night Owls at Risk for Weight Gain. Northwestern University.
7.Stevenson, Shawn.Sleep Smarter: 21 Essential Strategies to Sleep Your Way to a Better Body Better Health and Bigger Success. Hay House, 2014.
9.Putilov, Arcady A. “Association of morning and evening lateness with self-scored health: Late to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy in his own eyes.” Biological Rhythm Research 39, no. 4 (2008): 321-333.
10.Elder, Charles R. “Integrating Natural Medicine Into Conventional Clinical Practice: The Example of Vedic Medicine.” Integrative Medicine 10, no. 2 (2011): 56.
11.Bhat, Archana I., Praveen Kumar Anandgal, and Mahesh K. Vyas. “International Journal Of Ayurvedic And Herbal Medicine 2: 3 (2012) 515: 519.”

Disclaimer: The content is purely informative and educational in nature and should not be construed as medical advice. Please use the content only in consultation with an appropriate certified medical or healthcare professional.

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