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7 Benefits Of Myrtle Essential Oil

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Myrtle oil can be used to repel mosquitos and other insects. In the body, myrtle’s anti-microbial properties will fight bacterial vaginosis and protect wounds from infection. You can also use it on the skin to soothe skin irritation and joint inflammation. In aromatherapy, myrtle essential oil is respected for its sedative benefits. Inhaling this oil will also improve symptoms of respiratory problems like bronchitis or asthma. Because of these diverse benefits, myrtle doubles as a great multi-tasking oil.

Myrtle essential oil is made from the flowers, leaves, and stem of the myrtle plant or Myrtus communis L.. You can find it in the Mediterranean, northern Africa, India, and western Asia. It’s also about to be your new favorite remedy!

As an oil, myrtle is known for its fresh and sweet scent. No wonder it can be found in so many natural perfumes and soaps. But beyond its smell, myrtle oil can benefit you in these seven ways.

7 Benefits Of Myrtle Essential Oil

1. Repels Mosquitos

Myrtle Essential Oil Repels Mosquitos

During the summer, dealing mosquitos can be a pain. Instead of using harsh chemicals products, reach for myrtle oil. It can repel those pesky blood-suckers, according to a study in the Journal of Arthropod-Borne Diseases. This is especially useful if you’re in an area that’s prone to malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases.

To use myrtle oil on the skin, dilute one drop in one drop carrier oil. You can also use it in a wearable diffuser to protect you on the go.1

2. Treats Bacterial Vaginosis

Myrtle Essential Oil Treats Bacterial Vaginosis

Myrtle essential oil has potent anti-bacterial properties. It can even treat an infection of the vulva and vagina known as bacterial vaginosis or vaginitis.

Typically, this condition is cured with metronidazole vaginal gel alone. However, researchers at the Shahrekord Medical University of Sciences found that the treatment was more effective when myrtle was added to the gel. The bacterial vaginosis also came back in 30 percent of the metronidazole participants, but not in those who had myrtle.2

3. Protects Wounds

Myrtle Essential Oil Protects Wounds

Because myrtle oil is an antimicrobial, it can shield wounds from infection.3 This will help the injury heal without any complications.

So the next time you get a cut, consider applying myrtle essential oil. Again, don’t forget to dilute it in a carrier like olive oil, coconut oil, or grapeseed oil.

4. Soothes Skin Inflammation

Myrtle Essential Oil Soothes Skin Inflammation

Is your skin acting up? Reach for myrtle essential oil. Its anti-inflammatory abilities will ease redness, swelling, and itchiness. Your irritated skin will love it, especially if you add aloe or honey.

5. Relieves Joint Pain

Myrtle Essential Oil Relieves Joint Pain

For a natural arthritis remedy, use myrtle oil. The anti-inflammatory properties will relax swollen and painful joints. To apply, simply massage it onto the areas that are bothering you.

You can also blend myrtle with other oils for added relief. Wintergreen, citrus, lavender, oregano, peppermint, and rosemary are all excellent options.

6. Aids Sleep

Myrtle Essential Oil Aids Sleep

Thanks to its sedative effect, myrtle oil can be used for a good night’s rest. It works by making your central nervous system relax. As a result, you’ll be able to wind down and sleep well.4

To reap the benefits, inhale myrtle oil. You can also rub diluted myrtle essential oil on your temples. Try blending it with other soothing oils like lavender, chamomile, and cedarwood.

7. Improves Respiratory Health

Myrtle Essential Oil Improves Respiratory Health

In aromatherapy, myrtle oil can alleviate the symptoms of respiratory conditions. It’s especially useful if you have bronchitis, asthma, or a stuffy nose. Inhaling the oil will calm the respiratory tract, helping oxygen pass through with ease. The sedative properties will also slow down breathing.

For an oil with diverse benefits, myrtle is relatively affordable. It’s the epitome of a multi-tasking remedy, making it an excellent choice for when you’re on the go.

References   [ + ]

1. Tavassoli, M., M. Shayeghi, MOHAMMAD REZA Abai, H. Vatandoost, M. Khoobdel, M. Salari, A. Ghaderi, and F. Rafi. “Repellency effects of essential oils of myrtle (Myrtus communis), marigold (Calendula officinalis) compared with DEET against Anopheles stephensi on human volunteers.” Journal of Arthropod-Borne Diseases 5, no. 2 (2011): 10.
2. Masoudi, Mansoureh, Sepideh Miraj, and Mahmoud Rafieian-Kopaei. “Comparison of the effects of Myrtus communis L, berberis vulgaris and metronidazole vaginal gel alone for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis.” Journal of clinical and diagnostic research: JCDR 10, no. 3 (2016): QC04.
3. Bouzabata, Amel, Joseph Casanova, Ange Bighelli, Carlos Cavaleiro, Ligia Salgueiro, and Félix Tomi. “The Genus Myrtus L. in Algeria: Composition and Biological Aspects of Essential Oils from M. communis and M. nivellei: A Review.” Chemistry & biodiversity 13, no. 6 (2016): 672-680.
4. Birhanie, Muluken Walle, Bizuayehu Walle, and Kidist Rebba. “Hypnotic effect of the essential oil from the leaves of Myrtus communis on mice.” Nature and science of sleep 8 (2016): 267.