Why Is Ginger Garlic Paste Good For Your Health? 8 Reasons

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Benefits Of Ginger Garlic Paste

Ginger garlic paste combines two of nature's most powerful healers. These anti-inflammatory herbs reduce migraine severity and pain and inflammation in the muscles and teeth. They lower blood pressure, help in digestion, treat digestive disorders, clear up phlegm, reduce blood clotting, and prevent cancer. Ginger garlic paste is also known to boost libido. Use 1 tablespoon in cooking.

Ginger and garlic are natural herbs that have been used in Ayurveda for centuries, and ginger garlic paste is a condiment used widely in Asian cuisine. The medicinal and therapeutic properties have made the herbs two of nature’s most powerful healers. Imagine the goodness of using both together in your food. Here’s a list of the benefits of consuming ginger garlic paste on a regular basis.

Make your own ginger garlic paste

 

  • Chop freshly washed ginger into small cubes.
  • Carefully peel fresh garlic.
  • Blend the peeled garlic and chopped ginger together (in the ratio 1:1).
  • Add a pinch of salt to the mixture.
  • Drizzle a healthy oil in the mixture.
  • Refrigerate the paste for long-term use.

1. Lowers Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is one of the most common ailments experienced globally. If you suffer from high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels, ginger garlic paste can effectively bring the levels back to normal. In a study, patients with mild hypertension found that consuming garlic regularly brought down their blood pressure level.1 Ginger, meanwhile, is proven to reduce high blood pressure by clearing the calcium deposits on the wall of the arteries.2 However, if you have severe hypertension, ginger garlic paste can only supplement conventional medicine. Also eat these foods to lower blood pressure naturally.

2. Aids Digestion

If you’ve been having a particularly upset or bloated tummy, head to the kitchen to make yourself some ginger garlic paste. Both ginger and garlic have been used extensively in traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda for their antibacterial properties, which aid digestion. Their anti-inflammatory properties also reduce gastric ulcers, diarrhea, and stomach ache. Ginger, especially, is known to protect the gastrointestinal tract and prevent conditions like constipation, dyspepsia, belching, bloating, gastritis, epigastric discomfort (in the upper abdomen), indigestion, nausea, and vomiting.3

3. Reduces Pain And Inflammation

If you frequently experience headaches or muscle pain, it would be a good idea to forgo commercial medication and opt for ginger garlic paste. Popular anti-inflammatory painkiller drugs use chemicals that might cause serious side effects if used for a long period of time. Ginger garlic paste is a natural painkiller that does not cause any adverse effect. Both ginger and garlic have anti-inflammatory properties that treat the inflamed tissues and reduce pain. The paste can be used to relieve tooth pain, migraines, back pain, muscle pain, and arthritis.4 Studies have also proved that ginger is effective in relieving pain caused due to premenstrual syndrome.

4. Relieves Chest And Nasal Congestion

Be it a simple issue like the common cold or a serious complication like asthma, ginger garlic paste is known to reduce symptoms of most respiratory ailments. Both garlic and ginger have the ability to loosen phlegm and relieve nasal congestion. Ginger also comforts a sore throat and soothes aching muscles. Garlic is considered a powerful antibiotic and is often recommended for treating colds and flu.5 However, with chronic diseases like asthma, the paste can alleviate the symptoms of the condition but not bring down the stage of the illness.6

5. Prevents Stomach Cancer

According to the National Cancer Institute, about 39.6% Americans are diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives.7 This alarming statistic increases the need for us to work toward reducing our risk of cancer. Garlic contains certain active anti-carcinogenic elements that resist tumor growth. Studies have noted that regularly consuming garlic can prevent stomach and colorectal cancers.8 Ginger owes its cancer-preventive properties to certain pungent elements (gingerol and paradol) present in it. These elements are potent antioxidants that can reduce cancer risk.9 Ginger garlic paste combines both these medicinal herbs to effectively prevent cancer.

6. Increases Libido

Have you been bored between the sheets? Well, ginger garlic paste might be what you’re looking for. Ginger and garlic are both believed to be aphrodisiacs that boost sex drive and increase stamina. Although there has been no research that looks at the herbs and their association with libido, it is believed by several people to increase their sex drive. The allicin in garlic is also known to treat impotency by improving blood circulation.

7. Delays Aging

Spotting a gray hair or wrinkled skin is never easy. But you know what’s worse than the physical signs of aging? That’s right, the chronic diseases that come with old age. Garlic has antioxidants that prevent or delay the onset of age-related chronic ailments. It is believed to increase immunity and inhibit platelet aggregation, thrombus (blood clots inside blood vessels) formation, prevent cancer, diseases associated with cerebral aging, arthritis, cataract formation, and rejuvenate skin, improve blood circulation, and energy levels.10

8. Detoxifies The Body

Thanks to its antioxidant properties, fresh ginger garlic paste is an effective agent for detoxing. It can flush out toxins from the body11 and make you feel rejuvenated. Ayurveda, in fact, views garlic as a “rasayana” herb that relaxes the body and boosts immunity.12

Dosage And Precautions

To dilute the odor and pungent taste of the paste, use it in cooking. Make sure you don’t add too much of the paste, as it can give a distinct, strong flavor that you might not enjoy.

Every day, add 1 tablespoon of ginger garlic paste to your food to derive maximum benefits.

Avoid using ginger and garlic if you have a surgery coming up, as the herbs might make you bleed more. Also, before consuming the paste regularly, consult your doctor and ensure that it is safe for you.

References   [ + ]

1.Auer, W., A. Eiber, E. Hertkorn, E. Hoehfeld, U. Koehrle, A. Lorenz, F. Mader, W. Merx, G. Otto, and B. Schmid-Otto. “Hypertension and hyperlipidaemia: garlic helps in mild cases.” British journal of clinical practice. Supplement 69 (1990): 3-6.
2.Ghayur, Muhammad Nabeel, and Anwarul Hassan Gilani. “Ginger lowers blood pressure through blockade of voltage-dependent calcium channels.” Journal of cardiovascular pharmacology 45, no. 1 (2005): 74-80.
3.Haniadka, Raghavendra, Elroy Saldanha, Venkatesh Sunita, Princy L. Palatty, Raja Fayad, and Manjeshwar Shrinath Baliga. “A review of the gastroprotective effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe).” Food & Function 4, no. 6 (2013): 845-855.
4.Srivastova, K. C., and T. Mustafa. “Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and rheumatic disorders.” Med Hypotheses 29, no. 1 (1989): 25-8.
5.Raal, Ain, Daisy Volmer, Renata Soukand, Sofia Hratkevitš, and Raivo Kalle. “Complementary treatment of the common cold and flu with medicinal plants–results from two samples of pharmacy customers in Estonia.” PLoS One 8, no. 3 (2013): e58642.
6.Rouhi, Hamid, Forouzan Ganji, and Hamid Nasri. “Effects of Ginger on the improvement of asthma [the evaluation of Its treatmental effects].” Pak J Nutr 5, no. 4 (2006): 373-6.
7.Cancer Statistic. National Cancer Institute.
8.Fleischauer, Aaron T., Charles Poole, and Lenore Arab. “Garlic consumption and cancer prevention: meta-analyses of colorectal and stomach cancers.” The American journal of clinical nutrition 72, no. 4 (2000): 1047-1052.
9.Shukla, Yogeshwer, and Madhulika Singh. “Cancer preventive properties of ginger: a brief review.” Food and chemical toxicology 45, no. 5 (2007): 683-690.
10.Rahman, Khalid. “Garlic and aging: new insights into an old remedy.” Ageing research reviews 2, no. 1 (2003): 39-56.
11.Wang, Er-Jia, Yan Li, Marie Lin, Laishun Chen, Adam P. Stein, Kenneth R. Reuhl, and Chung S. Yang. “Protective effects of garlic and related organosulfur compounds on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.” Toxicology and applied pharmacology 136, no. 1 (1996): 146-154.
12.Sharma, Hari. Christopher S. Clark. Ayurvedic Healing: Contemporary Maharishi Ayurveda Medicine and Science Second Edition. Singing Dragon, 2011.

Disclaimer: The content is purely informative and educational in nature and should not be construed as medical advice. Please use the content only in consultation with an appropriate certified medical or healthcare professional.

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