Quantcast
CONTINUE READING

Young Girl Has Tapeworm Cyst Half The Size Of Her Brain Removed

Bookmark

by

1

Worm-phobics beware, this one’s not for you, but read on anyway.

In India, recently, doctors discovered a giant tapeworm cyst which had grown and taken up close to half a 12-year-old girl’s brain.

What began as years of weakness, headaches and seizures, ended positively when doctors took a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in Sterling Hospital located in central India and found a 0.45-kilogram i.e. 1-pound cyst close to the size of a melon. They say, it could have only taken close to 10 years to grow to this size.1

The little girl was then diagnosed with what is known as neurocysticercosis. Considering its size, she could have died anytime because the bubble-like nature of the cyst was like a time-bomb waiting to explode. If the cyst had burst, it could have only been discovered post-mortem.

Dr. Chirag Solanki, a neuro & spine surgeon conducted the 2.5-hour-long operation surgery and removed the cyst. It was found to be caused by one of the most common parasitic tapeworms.

Tapeworms usually have these slim, snake-like bodies, in adulthood but start out as larvae. However, they are still dangerous, if consumed, as they can penetrate tissues in the body, muscles and brain, forming cysts wherever they find haven.

The girl’s father, Kishor Parbat Jogi said, “My daughter is now back to normal and is doing very well.”

It has a tumultuous bunch of years for the little girl and her family but she is now on her way to healing and very lucky indeed.

References   [ + ]

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

FURTHER READING