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What Are the Best Ways To Get A Good Sweat Going?

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Work up a sweat by running instead of walking. Sprint for a short distance to get your heart rate up. Wear a sweatshirt to the gym. Practise intense yoga asanas, like Bikram Yoga. Turn up the heat by adding capsaicin-containing spices like peppers and chillies to your food. Sip on hot coffee, tea, or soup for short sweats. Replenish electrolytes lost through sweat.

Sweating, also known as perspiration, is the body’s natural mechanism of getting rid of toxins through the body’s sweat glands. We have about 2-4 million sweat glands in our body. The sweat glands usually become active after puberty. The process of sweating is controlled by the autonomic nervous system. Sweating is the body’s natural mechanism of regulating body temperature.

Causes Of Excessive Sweating

While sweating is a natural process, one must be aware that excess sweating can often be a sign of trouble. Excess sweating can be indicative of the following:

  • Extreme pain
  • Anxiety
  • Fever
  • Hyperhidrosis (a condition characterized by excess sweating. This is an endocrine disorder)
  • Low blood sugar or hypoglycemia due to diabetes medication or insulin
  • Heart ailments
  • PMS or Menopause

While it is essential to be mindful of conditions which trigger excess sweating, sweating is very important to your body to regulate body-environment temperature and rid the body of excess toxins.

Here are some methods to get a good sweat going without compromising on safety:

Exercises For Sweating

Exercise is of course the best way to work out a sweat. Be aware that sweating alone does not give you any measure of calories burned. Understand your body’s sweat mechanism. Some people break into a sweat easily while others take some time to get warmed up. If you want to get that sweat, step up the intensity of your workout. Try jogging instead of walking or if your body can hold up, do a short sprint. If you are working out indoors, wear a sweatshirt. Go for medium thickness so you can work up more sweat. If you are in a temperature-controlled room, turn up the temperature a bit so you sweat at a faster rate.

Yoga

Yoga is also known to aid sweating. However, be aware not all asanas or postures will help you sweat. Check with a certified yoga instructor on the best yoga practices for a good sweat. Moving the limbs in certain directions can trigger a good sweat. Keep safety in mind when engaging in yoga postures that increase your perspiration rate. Some specific forms of yoga, like Bikram Yoga (also termed as “hot” yoga), have a sequence of intensive asanas designed to get your sweat glands flowing. This is also done in an indoor environment where the temperatures are kept sufficiently high.

Spicy Foods

Spicy foods are the easiest way to work up some sweat! Peppers or chillies contain capsaicin which gets your metabolism into action thereby producing a good sweat.

Hot Foods

Hot foods or beverages also tend to make you sweat for a short duration though. Try a cup of hot coffee or tea or even a bowl of hot soup. You will work out a sweat for a couple of minutes as your body reacts to the high temperature of the food/drink.

Working up a good sweat is a great way to rid your body of toxins and excess salts while also helping you reduce body mass. Remember that exercise and other body-related activities are the best way to get that sweat going. Be cautious when you are working out as excessive sweat can leave you dehydrated and lead to loss of electrolytes. Keep water handy and consume in plenty especially during physical activities.1

References   [ + ]

1.Sweating, Medline Plus
CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.