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Watermelon Salad With Tomato, Basil, And Lime [Recipe]

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Summer is here and melons are the flavor of the season. Here's a recipe that gives a tangy, crunchy mouth feel and is super rich in nutrients. Want to try?

I’ve returned to a favorite summertime recipe, with a delicious blend of savory, sweet, tangy, crunchy textures that pop in your mouth.

In the summer, I’m usually obsessed with melons, consuming a fresh melon nearly every week. In the winter, I pretty much don’t eat them. Like tomatoes and many fruits and vegetables, melons don’t really taste good out of season.

This favorite recipe of mine offers an explosion of flavor, antioxidants, and anti-cancer plant chemicals. It’s super easy to prepare, too.

I’m not sure which is easier – making it or eating it. But before we dive into the salad, let’s take an intellectual moment of appreciation for the food adventure that awaits us.

Reasons To Love Watermelon

  1. May help lower your risk of colorectal cancer.
  2. When consumed with other foods high in carotenoids, it has proven to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.
  3. The lycopene content in 1 cup of watermelon is comparable to the lycopene found in two medium raw tomatoes and is easier to absorb.
  4. The rind stimulates nitric oxide production, which improves circulation in arteries.

Reasons To Love Tomatoes

  1. They are packed with antioxidants and plant chemicals, such as phytosterols, beta-carotene, polyphenols and lycopene. Lycopene is a potent antioxidant, which is better absorbed from cooked tomatoes.
  2. The antioxidants also protect your heart with anti-inflammatory properties.
  3. Protect against other cancers, such as cancer of the liver, prostate, colon, and ovarian.

Combine The Two Into A Salad

  1. Chop watermelon and tomatoes into chunks, chop the herbs.
  2. Mix dressing, toss with salad.
  3. You might find it easier to lightly toss dressing with tomatoes, then add to watermelon.
  4. Finally, add your herbs, feta, and nuts. Toss gently and serve.
  5. Make it vegan or paleo by omitting the feta. Add 1-2 tbsp more lime or vinegar to enhance flavor.

Ingredients

  • 6 cups seedless watermelon, cut into about 1-inch chunks
  • 1-1/2 cups ripe tomatoes, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 1/2 tsp large grain sea salt
  • 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp balsamic or lime juice
  • 3-4 tbsp chopped fresh basil, parsley, or mint (or a combo of all three)
  • About 1 cup crumbled feta (not for vegan or paleo versions)
  • 3/4 cup roasted pistachios (or any nut of your choice)

Super Simple Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, combine melon and tomatoes. You may have leftover melon if it doesn’t all fit into your bowl.
  2. Combine salt with oil and vinegar, and pour over melon and tomato mixture.
  3. Sprinkle in the chopped herbs.
  4. Toss melon and tomato mixture to distribute.
  5. To serve, top the salad with feta cheese and pistachios.
  6. If desired, serve melon salad over a bed of fresh arugula.
  7. Give thanks for the colorific abundance and enjoy!

Best if served immediately.

Now I want to hear from you. In the comments below, please tell me how do you enjoy melon? Do you think you’ll try this recipe?

Frances Arnold

I am a registered dietitian, integrative and functional nutritionist and an experienced Registered yoga teacher. My journey began when I spiraled into a chronic illness. Despite a wholesome diet, regular exercise, daily meditation, and two degrees. I had advanced Celiac disease (this took so long to discover that my tooth enamel eroded); 27 food sensitivities; and multiple nutrient deficiencies. After intensive training and ongoing nutrition therapy, I went from immobilized to restored, vibrant living. My specialties in integrative and functional nutrition include Autoimmunity (Celiac disease, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis0; Food Reactivity (Gluten and Other food sensitivities); Fatigue Pain (Migraines, headaches, inflammation); Digestion.

Frances Arnold

I am a registered dietitian, integrative and functional nutritionist and an experienced Registered yoga teacher. My journey began when I spiraled into a chronic illness. Despite a wholesome diet, regular exercise, daily meditation, and two degrees. I had advanced Celiac disease (this took so long to discover that my tooth enamel eroded); 27 food sensitivities; and multiple nutrient deficiencies. After intensive training and ongoing nutrition therapy, I went from immobilized to restored, vibrant living. My specialties in integrative and functional nutrition include Autoimmunity (Celiac disease, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis0; Food Reactivity (Gluten and Other food sensitivities); Fatigue Pain (Migraines, headaches, inflammation); Digestion.

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