Quantcast
CONTINUE READING

Is Vitamin Deficiency The Cause Of Back And Joint Pain?

Share this with a friend

Your Name
Recipient Email
Subject
Message

by
2 Min Read

Vitamin deficiency triggers a cascade of health problems. Researchers have found an association between extremely low vitamin D levels and chronic, general pain that doesn’t respond to treatment. Apart from supplements, fresh oranges and orange juices, salmon, tuna, eggs, fortified breads and cereals and milk are also good sources of vitamin D.

Curejoy Expert Dipti Mothay Explains:

Vitamin deficiency triggers a cascade of health problems. Vitamin D deficiency in particular causes headache, back pain and joint pain. Researchers have found an association between extremely low vitamin D levels and chronic, general pain that doesn’t respond to treatment.

Vitamin D blood levels of 30-40 ng/mL are considered ideal. The National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements says vitamin D deficiency causes bone pain and can even result in arthritis. In some cases, resolving a vitamin D deficiency may help you manage your back and joint pain.

How Low Levels Of Vitamin D Cause Back And Joint Pain?

Researchers say that correcting low level of vitamin D can provide pain relief in patients with back and joint pain. Vitamin D is important for bone, cartilage and muscle function. Research has also suggested that too little or too much vitamin D supplementation may offer limited results, so a physician knowledgeable in helping to correct joint pain is important.

Vitamin D deficiency can be accompanied by leg pain, burning in the feet, and difficulty with balance, probably through secondary vitamin B deficiencies of B12, B5 or B6. Poor sleep and pantothenic acid deficiency could lead to body pain on awakening; fibromyalgia, arthritis, chronic low back pain, knee pain and hip pain.

Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) typically have widespread chronic pain and fatigue. For those with low vitamin D levels, vitamin D supplements can reduce pain and may be a cost-effective alternative to other treatments.

–Sources Of Vitamin D

You get vitamin D from only two sources: from sunlight exposure on your skin and from your food and supplements. There are a few foods containing vitamin D. Fresh oranges and orange juices do have vitamin D. Salmon, tuna, eggs, fortified breads and cereals and milk are also good sources of vitamin D.

 

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.