Quantcast
CONTINUE READING

Why And How To Use Avocado Oil For Cooking

Bookmark

by
6 Min Read

Avocado Oil For Cooking

Not only is avocado oil loaded with healthy fats, vitamins, and minerals, it helps your body absorb nutrients like carotenoids too. While its mild flavor lends it well to curries, grills, and bakes, its high smoking point of 255 °C makes it ideal for deep frying, not just for stir-frying or as salad dressing. Store it in a cool, dry, and dark place to prevent its monounsaturated and saturated fats from going bad because of oxidization.

Ever increasing in popularity across the world, thanks to its claims of being one of the healthiest foods on earth, avocado is a powerhouse of nutrients. It is rich in vitamins, potassium, and folate. Moreover, its rich and creamy texture makes it versatile and a great addition to a variety of dishes, from salads to pasta. That’s not all.

Packing in all the nutritive value and making a place for itself in kitchens globally is avocado oil, the edible oil pressed from the fruit.

What Makes Avocado Oil Special?

High Good Fat Content

Avocado oil is one of those rare oils that are pressed from the pulp of the fruit rather than the seed. And since avocado is a fruit with a high fat content—over 75 percent—most of it in the form of oleic acid, a healthful monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid, the oil is just as nutritious. It has similar nutritive value as olive oil, with similar benefits and heart-healthy properties. Moreover, not only are the fats healthy, they also increase the absorption of healthy plant nutrients like carotenoids from a meal.

High Smoking Point

As avocado has a high smoking point, about 255 °C (490 F), which is much higher than that of olive oil, it can withstand a lot of heat before it starts releasing smoke, loses all its nutrients and flavors and turns rancid, and burns the food. This makes it a safe option for deep frying.1

Mild Flavor

It’s a light oil with a mild and delicate flavor that mixes well with all kinds of food and enhances their flavor rather than dominate them.

Low Extent Of Oxidation

Oils turn rancid when the fats in them become oxidized after coming into contact with oxygen and start releasing harmful free radicals. This happens mostly when the fats are of the polyunsaturated type. Avocado oil has 68.4 percent monounstaurated fats, 19.31 percent saturated fats, and 11.75 percent polyunsaturated fats,2 which makes it a stable oil. Moreover, while synthetic antioxidants are added to other oils to lower their oxidation tendency, avocado oil is already rich in antioxidants. Just make sure you store organic avocado oil in a cool, dry, and dark place to keep the plant nutrients intact.3

Avocado oil has 68.4 percent monounstaurated fats, 19.31 percent saturated fats, and 11.75 percent polyunsaturated fats,4 which makes it a stable oil.

Health Benefits Of Avocado Oil

Brings Down Cholesterol With Oleic Acid

Extra-virgin avocado oil from the Hass variety of avocados is emerald green in color because of the high levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids in it. Just like olive oil, avocado oil is a great source of oleic acid, one of the omega-9 fatty acids that are known to reduce cholesterol and improve cardiovascular health.5

Keeps The Heart Healthy With Beta-Sitosterol

Avocado oil has a significant amount of beta-sitosterol, a type of plant sterol that the body can use to break down unhealthy fats into more usable forms.6

Prevents Free Radical Damage With Antioxidants

Cold-pressed avocado oil is rich in pigments like chlorophyll and carotenoids that act as antioxidants and fight free radicals responsible for many conditions like inflammation, cancer, and skin and eye ailments.

Helps With Weight Management

As a slow-digested carb rich with dietary fiber, it keeps you satiated for longer. For that reason alone, this oil could fit well in your weight loss plan, since.7 A study found that people who ate avocados regularly had lower weight, BMI, and waist size.8

Ways To Use Avocado Oil For Cooking

Avocado oil can be as versatile as your innovative cooking ideas. It adds a mild, buttery richness to your food. Use it to make salad dressings, to drizzle over your dips, for stir fries, to pan roast and bake.

Salad Dressing

Whisk some avocado oil with lemon juice, salt, and pepper to create a simple vinaigrette for your salad, especially if it’s a colorful salad of fruits and veggies. Avocado oil can help your body absorb the carotenoids in the salad by up to 15 percent.9

Drizzle

If you are serving dips, drizzle the oil on top for added flavor. Also, you could drizzle it over soups, garlic bread, or even toast. You could even infuse the oil with your favorite herbs. Use it on crusty bread to make an excellent side for your soup.

Baking

Substitute butter with avocado oil to bake healthier cakes and cookies.

Stir Fry

Sauté your greens in avocado oil along with garlic and other seasonings for a flavorful side.

Grill

When grilling or pan-frying meat, avocado oil can be a great choice, thanks to its high smoking point. The lovely flavor only adds to the meat’s appeal.

Curries

Since it has a mild flavor, avocado oil will not overpower the spices in curries much. In fact, it will complement them well with its buttery texture.

Deep Fry

Fry your potato crisps and croquettes in avocado oil without worrying about the health factor.

Dashing to the market already? Just remember to buy a bottle of cold-pressed organic emerald-green avocado oil and not the refined pale yellow variety. And don’t forget to share your unique avocado oil recipes with us.

References   [ + ]

1. Bergh, B. O. “The Avocado and Human Nutrition. II. Avocados and Your Heart.” In Proc. of Second World Avocado Congress, pp. 37-47. 1992.
2, 4. Berasategi, Izaskun, Blanca Barriuso, Diana Ansorena, and Iciar Astiasarán. “Stability of avocado oil during heating: Comparative study to olive oil.” Food chemistry 132, no. 1 (2012): 439-446.
3.Werman, M. J., and I. Neeman. “Oxidative stability of avocado oil.” Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society 63, no. 3 (1986): 355-360.
5. Wong, Marie, Cecilia Requejo-Jackman, and A. B. Woolf. “What is unrefined, extra virgin cold-pressed avocado oil.” J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc 87 (2010): 1099.
6. dos Santos, Marco AZ, Tatiana VR Alicieo, Claudio MP Pereira, Guillermo Ramis-Ramos, and Carla RB Mendonça. “Profile of bioactive compounds in avocado pulp oil: influence of the drying processes and extraction methods.” Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society 91, no. 1 (2014): 19-27.
7. Dreher, Mark L., and Adrienne J. Davenport. “Hass avocado composition and potential health effects.” Critical reviews in food science and nutrition53 , no. 7 (2013): 738-750.
8.López, Ledesma R., Munari AC Frati, Domínguez BC Hernández, Montalvo S. Cervantes, Luna MH Hernández, C. Juarez, and Lira S. Morán. “Monounsaturated fatty acid (avocado) rich diet for mild hypercholesterolemia.” Archives of medical research 27, no. 4 (1995): 519-523.
9.Unlu, Bohn TT, Clinton SK and Schwartz SJ. “Carotenoid absorption from salad and salsa by humans is enhanced by the addition of avocado or avocado oil.” The Journal of Nutrition (2005 Mar; 135(3):431-6).
CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.