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What Does Traditional Chinese Medicine Recommend For Infertility?

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Acupuncture can help you get rid of stress by stimulating the hypothalamus to balance the endocrine system. It also increases blood supply to the uterus and builds up the uterine lining. Tai Chi promotes whole mind-body health beneficial for hormonal balance. Soybean and Gossypium have pro-estrogen and pro-androgen properties.

Drop in fertility rates has led to the rise of modern treatment plans like in vitro fertilization, egg transfers and other reproductive technologies. Can traditional medicine help?

Traditional Chinese Medicine Techniques For Infertility

Fertility is a complex function. Sometimes, the root cause may be irreversible, due to genetic factors or because of a specific medical problem associated with some part of the reproductive system. However, in most cases, fertility is a function of hormonal balance. This balance is sensitive to mind-body health, with diet and life style as major contributing factors. For example, stress and obesity can lead to infertility.1 A change in diet and life style can reverse the problem.

Acupuncture and Acupressure

As per Chinese medicine, life energy (chi) flows through the body through various channels. When this life energy is blocked, health problems occur. Channels can be unblocked by stimulating specific points on these channels known as acupoints. These points can be stimulated by applying pressure using your hands (acupressure) or by inserting thin needles (acupuncture). Specific points are associated with different body functions and organs, which allows targeted treatment.

Acupuncture can help counter balance stress. When stress hormone cortisol is released, it impacts pituitary balance leading to reproductive function disturbance. It may also alter sperm count in men. Acupuncture can help you get rid of the root cause by stimulating the hypothalamus to balance the endocrine system! It also increases blood supply to the uterus and builds up the uterine lining.That’s not it. It is absolutely safe compared to conventional medicine, if sterile needles are used.

Acupuncture has been shown to increases success rates for IVF treatments.2

Tai Chi

Traditional Chinese Medicine sees the body as a whole (not just a collection of parts). All systems are intertwined. You cannot cure infertility (or for that matter any other problem) in an isolated manner.

Tai Chi improves the flow of life energy (chi) through the body, using continuous, graceful movements. It enables an individual to introspect and find harmony between mind, body and environment (balance between Yin and Yang). As you practice Tai Chi, breathing and blood circulation improve, joints and muscles get strengthened and supple, the mind gets focused and calm. All of these contribute to hormonal balance and consequently play a role in improving fertility.

Beneficial Food

Gossypol

Gossypol has anti-fertility activity in both men and women. It is derived from the seed, root or stem of the cotton plant, Gossypium. This is known to  inhibit progesterone and HCG-induced testosterone production. It also suppresses spermatogenesis effectively.

Soybean

Soybean possesses strong phytoestrogenic properties, that exert an estrogen-like action on the body. These phytoestrogens influence all aspects of the reproductive process through morphology.3

Takeaway

Keep in mind that, in most cases, infertility is a resultant of bad lifestyle and diet choices. Traditional Chinese Medicine techniques can certainly help. Ensure that you find a well-versed practitioner in this discipline to guide you!

References   [ + ]

1.Wasser, Samuel K., G. R. E. T. C. H. E. N. Sewall, and M. R. Soules. “Psychosocial stress as a cause of infertility.” Fertility and sterility 59.3 (1993): 685-689
2.Acupuncture Shows Promise in Improving Rates of Pregnancy Following IVF, National Center for Complimentary and Integrative Health
3.Huang, Kee C. The pharmacology of Chinese herbs. CRC press, 1998
CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.