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Spanking Makes Kids Aggressive, Less Successful, Study Finds

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A number of people till date strongly support the idea of spanking kids. But, a new study says spanking doesn’t work and can make kids aggressive later on.

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When you spank your children they might not immediately defy you but, they are most likely to be aggressive later and will have a bad relationship with their parents. As they grow up they might also have alcohol and substance abuse problems.

The team at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Michigan focused on open-handed spanking — not beatings. “The upshot of the study is that spanking increases the likelihood of a wide variety of undesired outcomes for children. Spanking thus does the opposite of what parents usually want it to do,” said Andrew Grogan-Kaylor of the University of Michigan School of Social Work, who worked on the study.

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“Our analysis focuses on what most Americans would recognize as spanking and not on potentially abusive behaviors,” said Elizabeth Gershoff of the University of Texas at Austin.

They made a list of 17 undesirable outcomes, from immediate defiance to alcohol abuse in adulthood. Kids who were spanked more often failed in 13 out of the 17, they found.

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CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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