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What Are The Side Effects Of Eating A Lot Of Ginger?

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Dr Janardhana Hebbar

Curejoy Expert Dr.Janardhana Hebbar Explains:

Ginger has many wonderful health benefits and can be a powerful aid to treat stomach ailments, nausea and morning sickness. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine reports little evidence of significant side effects directly caused by ginger, though powdered ginger can cause gas, bloating and heartburn.

Using ginger during pregnancy has come under close scrutiny. There is some concern that ginger might affect fetal sex hormones. There are also reports of miscarriage. However, studies in pregnant women suggest that ginger can be used safely for morning sickness without harming the baby. The risk for major malformations in infants of women taking ginger does not appear to be higher than the usual rate of 1% to 3%. There is some concern that ginger might increase the risk of bleeding, so some experts advise against using it close to your delivery date.

One of ginger’s most notable effects in the body is to slow the clotting of blood. This can increase the effect of anticoagulant drugs, both over the counter and prescription. It also lowers blood glucose levels, so diabetics should be wary of consuming ginger. In combination with your existing medications, ginger can cause your blood glucose to become dangerously low. Similarly, anyone taking calcium channel blockers for high blood pressure should be cautious of consuming ginger in quantity.

Large doses of ginger may also cause sleepiness and minor sedation, according to MedlinePlus. Ginger may increase the risk of bleeding so if you have a bleeding disorder, so you should avoid eating large amounts of it or taking supplements. The safety limit for ginger intake is 2 gm for every kg of body mass, anything more than that is overdose. Over consumption may also lead to production of acids in the human body, leading to acidity.

Also read:

  1. Ginger, Could It Be The Universal Medicine?

  2. Ginger Elixir – Ayurvedic Digestive Drink.

  3. How Much Raw Ginger Can one Eat?

  4. Ginger: The Complete Herbal Wonder Medicine

 

Dr Janardhana Hebbar

Senior Ayurvedic Consultant at CureJoy, Dr. Hebbar has authored 4 books on Ayurveda. Special interests are Kayachikitsa (Internal Medicine) and Shalya chikitsa (Surgery).

Dr Janardhana Hebbar

Senior Ayurvedic Consultant at CureJoy, Dr. Hebbar has authored 4 books on Ayurveda. Special interests are Kayachikitsa (Internal Medicine) and Shalya chikitsa (Surgery).

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