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Shocking News – FDA Approves GMO Salmon

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For the first time in the US history, FDS has approved genetically engineered Salmon fit for sale in the US market. The decision has evoked mixed responses from the customers as some feel that this decision increases the risk of an impending environmental danger in the future.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved genetically engineered salmon fit for consumption on November 02, 2015. This the first time any genetically modified animal has been declared fit for sale or to be precise consumption by the US Government.

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The decision was made in the favor of Massachusetts-based firm AquaBounty Technologies, “based on sound science and a comprehensive review”. The approval certainly has brought joy to AquaBounty Technologies as their’s was the first company to approach FDA claiming that the product was safe for US consumers.

FDA has made it very clear in its ruling that the US will not be part of the breeding program as well as the raising of salmon. However, FDA will have a supervisory control over the salmon that will be raised in land-based, secure hatcheries in Panama and Canada.

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A Canadian Conservation group, on the other hand, has initiated its legal bid to stop the project in their country on environmental safety concerns. While GM food such as corn and soy are already readily available in the US market, however, this is the first time FDA has ever approved genetically engineered animal fit for consumption.

AquaBounty’s Salmon can grow twice as fast as the natural salmon owing to the combination of genes taken from Chinook salmon and an eel-like fish called Eelpout.

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There is a slight difference in opinions between various consumer and environment groups. While consumers were unhappy with the FDA’s decision and quoted, “inadequate science and unfounded assumptions” to the Washington Post. The environmental groups are concerned with the environmental safety as they claim this decision as a “huge live experiment”. They also believe that there is a huge possibility that these salmon could escape hatcheries and breed with wild salmon as the complete sterilization process has a failure rate of just 5%.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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