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Why Reduced-Fat Foods Are Making You Fat

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Yes, fat contains calories. If you eat a lot of fat, it may contribute to weight gain. But the same goes for any nutrient.

However, when you cut fat, you’re more likely to overdo it in the calorie department, upping your risk of weight gain, obesity, and related conditions like Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

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That’s because fat is the most satiating nutrient out there, taking longer to digest than either carbs or protein. When you eat fat, your blood sugar levels stay stable longer and you prevent excess hunger.

And, in most guys, those extra calories they consume don’t come from protein. They come from empty carbohydrates.

The less fat people eat, the more carbs they typically eat, and people are already getting more than twice their daily recommended intake of carbs.

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When you remove fat from a food product, it must be replaced with other ingredients in order to provide a yummy, profitable alternative. So if you take a food that had fat, remove it, triple the carbs, double the sugar, add extra ingredients to support the consistency and flavor, label it fat-free and consume it for years and years, you’re setting yourself up to be overweight and develop health problems, including abdominal fat, Type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular issues.

However, when people see a “low-fat” label, they automatically assume it’s healthier. When people eat low-fat packaged snacks, they wind up eating about 50 percent more calories that they do if they had eaten the full-fat version.

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CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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