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The Best Lotion For Perfect Skin In 3 Days

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We are a generation that looks for immediate results. Most of us believe the perfect product is out there. So, we fall for words like, “quick,” “immediate,” and “perfect skin.”

Turn your head away. There’s no such thing as perfect skin in 3 days. If you’ve found a product that gives you such promises, like flawless skin in a few days, prepare to be disappointed. Your skin requires weeks or months of pampering and care to look its best.

Here are other debunked skin myths to break your heart.

1. You are blessed with flawless skin. You don’t need skincare

Like to live life dangerously, do you? That’s what happens when you don’t use sunblock or moisturizer. You can thank your genes for a near-perfect skin. But it takes effort to carry it on for years. By not applying sunblock, you are doing the worst possible thing for your skin. Say hello to wrinkles and dark spots. Sun damage causes the skin to age at a quicker pace.

Skipping out on moisturizer makes your skin dry and ashy. When your skin is deprived of moisture over time, it loses elasticity. Your skin will sag, develop fine lines, and appear dull.

Regardless of age and gender, sunblock and moisturizer need to be a part of your skincare routine. Get with the program.

2. Applying makeup with SPF so you can skip out on sunblock

Don’t we wish we could address all skin issues just by using one product? While that be maybe the reason behind makeup with SPF, it doesn’t give you full-coverage protection from the sun. You would need to pack on 14 times the amount of powder and 7 times the amount of foundation to get sun protection.

Never depend on makeup to protect you from UVA and UVB rays. Apply moisturizer, sunblock and then reach out to makeup.

3. Higher the SPF, higher the protection

No. It doesn’t work like that. SPF refers to the ability of the sunblock to block UVB rays. An SPF of 30 blocks 97% of UVB rays, SPF 50 blocks 98% of UVB rays, and SPF 100 has a very negligible difference with the rest.

Also, just because you got on sunblock doesn’t mean you could lay under the sun for hours. You need to reapply every two hours.

4. Skipping out on moisturizer if you have oily skin

Do you stay away from moisturizing because of your oily skin? While it may seem like a messy situation in your head, it’s not the right thing for your skin. Skipping the moisturizer would make your skin dry and this would lead to more sebum production. This in turn could lead to breakouts.

Not all moisturizers stay greasy on your skin. Look for an oil-free version. Stay away from ingredients like petroleum, mineral oil, cocoa butter, and lanolin. Instead reach out to ingredients like glycerin, hyaluronic acid, aloe and squalane.

5. Washing your face with soap will keep your skin clean and perfect

Our skin is slightly acidic in nature. Soaps have a pH level higher than the normal range of skin. Using a high level pH soap could increase the skin pH. This means that your skin is opening doors to irritability and dehydration.1

Also, skin experts claim that using soaps would strip your skin from bacteria that are necessary to fight acne and eczema. Not to mention, how dry and tight your skin feels after using soap.

6. The perfect skin depends solely on what you put on your face

If only life was that simple. Skincare doesn’t stop at the surface. Your skin is also a reflection of what you put in your body. Eating fruits rich in water content and getting in leafy veggies for vitamins are important for your skin.

References   [ + ]

1.Tarun, Jose, Jose Susan, Veronica John Susan Jacob Suria, and Sebastian Criton. “Evaluation of pH of bathing soaps and shampoos for skin and hair care.” Indian journal of dermatology 59, no. 5 (2014): 442.
CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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