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New Research Shows Physical Activity Can Improve Bone Health

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A pre-menopausal female study suggests that during physical efforts, the body increases IGF-1 levels which prevent a further increase of sclerostin (a glycoprotein which inhibits bone growth and bone formation) from developing in the body. Make it your goal to increase your activity levels even in small increments (a 10-min brisk walk/treadmill) to improve the overall bone health!

Even small amounts of physical activity can improve bone health in pre-menopausal women, according to a research study released in Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism.

How Physical Activity Impacts Your Bone Health

Increasing physical activities in small intervals were shown to reduce sclerostin in the body, providing a positive effect on bone health.

During physical efforts, the body increases IGF-1 levels which prevent a further increase of sclerostin from developing in the body. Sclerostin, a glycoprotein, inhibits (hinders) bone growth and bone formation which negatively impacts overall bone health.

Bone tissue is always changing primarily due to hormone changes and/or levels of activity. When speaking of physical effort, the tissue changes positively, or negatively, based on the amount of activity an individual participates in.

Pre-Menopausal Female Study

Within the noted research study, over twelve-hundred (1,200) women were included for screening. Nearly sixty (60) of the women were randomly followed through an eight-week course which included physical training as compared to the control group (no activity).

Each woman was provided a medical examination and bone health measurements during the following. Additional turnover markers, serum sclerostin, as well as IGF-1 quantities, were tested.

Women who included at least two hours of physical activity each week held significantly lower levels of serum sclerostin. They also held higher levels of IGF-1 levels (as compared to the control group).

The result for the exercising group was much healthier for overall bone health indicators.

Practical Ways To Increase Your Physical Activity

Even minor changes in physical activity will normally improve bone health in individuals. Exercise/activity can be simple, inexpensive, and practical while providing improved health benefits.

Here are some simple suggestions which can improve your personal bone health:

  • Take ten-minute brisk walks.
  • Include fifteen minutes on the treadmill.
  • Do ten minutes of jumping jacks.
  • Add quick and easy standing push ups (push against the wall).
  • Play tag with the children, or shoot some hoops with the boys.

There are hundreds of ways to add simple, practical, yet inexpensive activities which “add up” through the week. Make it your goal to increase your activity levels even in small increments to improve your overall bone health!

Charles T Price

Charles T. “Chad” Price, MD is Professor of Florida State University College of Medicine and was a practicing pediatric orthopedic surgeon for 34 years. Dr. Price is rated as One of America's Top Doctors. He received a B.S degree from Emory University in Atlanta where he was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa honorary scholastic society. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and completed his orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Florida. He is an author of over 70 scientific papers, 20 textbook chapters, and three books on topics including bone lengthening, fracture healing, artificial bone grafting and other research topics. In 2013 he became certified as a Sports Nutritionist by the American Sports and Fitness Association.

Charles T Price

Charles T. “Chad” Price, MD is Professor of Florida State University College of Medicine and was a practicing pediatric orthopedic surgeon for 34 years. Dr. Price is rated as One of America's Top Doctors. He received a B.S degree from Emory University in Atlanta where he was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa honorary scholastic society. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and completed his orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Florida. He is an author of over 70 scientific papers, 20 textbook chapters, and three books on topics including bone lengthening, fracture healing, artificial bone grafting and other research topics. In 2013 he became certified as a Sports Nutritionist by the American Sports and Fitness Association.