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Is Makeup Remover Bad For Your Skin?

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3 Min Read

Synthetic makeup removers strip the skin of its natural oils, making it dry. Alcohol-based removers can irritate the skin. Mineral oils can clog the skin and cause acne and blackheads. Sodium lauryl sulphate can irritate the eyes and Diazolidinyl Urea can cause allergic reactions. Choose natural and nutritional alternatives like coconut oil, cucumber or yogurt.

Sleeping with your makeup ON is a big NO if you genuinely care for your skin. Makeup blocks pores, preventing the skin from “breathing” and blocking the natural cleansing and repairing processes that occur when you sleep. It eventually leads to acne breakouts, accelerates the aging process and makes your skin look dull.

A makeup remover cleanses the skin, preventing chemicals from reaching deeper levels of the skin, where their negative impact is compounded and long lasting.

Why Are Makeup Removers Bad For Your Skin?

Using any commercially available cleanser will strip the skin of its natural oils, causing your skin to look dry and dull. The extent of the damage depends on the sensitivity level of your skin. Alcohol-based removers can be especially irritating or drying to the skin.

Harmful Ingredients In Your Makeup Remover

Mineral Oil

Due to its ability to remove grease, mineral oil is often used in makeup removers. Applying it to your skin repeatedly can clog your pores and increase the risk of acne and blackheads. Mineral oil provides an oily layer to lock in moisture but does not offer any other nutritional benefits.

Sodium Lauryl Sulfate

Sodium Lauryl Sulfate is an excellent cleansing agent, but it can also irritate the skin and eyes. Sodium lauryl sulfate is a surfactant, detergent, and emulsifier used in cosmetic products, as well as in industrial cleaners. The real problem with Sodium Lauryl Sulfate is that the manufacturing process (ethoxylation) results in contamination by dioxane, a carcinogenic by-product [1].

Diazolidinyl Urea

This antimicrobial preservative is found in several cosmetic and skin care products. Diazolidinyl Urea can be a primary cause of contact dermatitis and allergic reactions. Allergy to Diazolidinyl Urea can result in red, swollen and itchy skin. It can also irritate the eyes [2].

Other potentially harmful ingredients include Benzalkonium Chloride and Cyclopentasiloxane which are both considered mild carcinogens [3].

Natural Makeup Removers

  • Coconut and Olive Oil: Contains anti-microbial and moisturizing elements.
  • Cucumber: Contains antioxidants and vitamins that help your skin retain moisture.
  • Almond Oil with Milk: Rich in antioxidants and vitamins E, A, D and B. Contains protein, essential minerals and healthy fats as well.
  • Yogurt: Contains lactic acid, beneficial in maintaining ideal skin pH levels

Conclusion

Since removing makeup is important for your skin health, opt for natural makeup removers that are gentler, safer and offer nutritional benefits to the skin. Avoid makeup removers that contain alcohol, fragrances and preservatives whenever possible and be on the lookout for the common chemical ingredients and their harmful side effects.

References

  1. Agner, Tove, and Jørgen Serup. “Sodium lauryl sulphate for irritant patch testing-a dose-response study using bioengineering methods for determination of skin irritation.” Journal of investigative dermatology 95.5 (1990): 543-547.
  2. Groot, Anton C., et al. “Contact allergy to diazolidinyl urea (Germall II®).”Contact dermatitis 18.4 (1988): 202-205.
  3. Basketter, David A., et al. “Strong irritants masquerading as skin allergens: the case of benzalkonium chloride.” Contact dermatitis 50.4 (2004): 213-217.
CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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