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Is Exercise A No-No During Your Period?

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Don’t you just hate it when it’s that time of the month again? You have to start being extra careful about the way you sleep, sit, and walk—all the while trying to suppress the urge of wanting to throw things at those around you (only applicable to the ladies).

You might feel like a zombie when you are on your period and the thought of curling up in your cozy bed throughout the day (preferably with a tub of ice cream or a cup of hot chocolate) seems far too tempting (beyond normal).

Some of you might cringe at the very thought of exercise during the Crimson Devil’s visit, while the rest of you might not want to budge from your daily fitness routine despite the havoc being wrecked down there. The dilemma of whether to hit the gym or whether to wait out the days of your periods feeling bloated and tired has existed for quite some time (and the mood swings don’t not help in any way!).

bloated

Before you make a decision whether to exercise or not when you are on your period, you need to know what the menstrual cycle (the monthly cycle of getting your periods) actually is and why you have to go through this bloody ordeal month after month after month.

Why Does Aunt Flow Visit Every Month?

Can Exercise Be Good For You?

When your oven is in cleaning mode and you feel it’s just not your day (or week), you can reap some benefits if you get up and get moving despite these troubled times.

Exercise Helps Relieve Period Symptoms

The process of bleeding from your lady parts anywhere from four to seven days is not at all easy and can have you feeling lethargic and bloated. To top it off, often (that’s an understatement) uncomfortable, gut-wrenching cramps accompany.

Your emotions overpower your reasoning, leaving you cranky at way past tolerable levels.

Contrary to what most people think, exercise can be a good way to alleviate some of these undesirable side effects that put you in this dilemma in the first place. You will finally be able to effortlessly decide which movie to watch, and not forget, looking dashing as ever as you do so.

What Happens When You Exercise?

  • During exercise your body releases a hormone called beta-endorphin. 1 Beta Endorphin is similar to morphine (you read that right). It helps modulate pain and boosts your mood (getting rid of the pain is more than enough to get you in a better mood).2
  • When you exercise, your body loses some body water in the form of sweat and that can make you feel less bloated.

So, why don’t you start looking for those workout clothes hidden somewhere in the back of your closet and make a move?

Which Exercises Can You Do During Shark Week?

Even though there is nothing wrong with exercising the way you want (as long as it is not too strenuous), there are some exercises that can be particularly helpful.

1. Test your flexibility with yoga asanas:

Yoga can be a great thing to try out when you are on your periods. Yoga can help relieve the pain of period cramps (also known as dysmenorrhea). 3 Try not to get too creative and keep it simple (you wouldn’t want to break something while you’re at it).

yoga

2. Jog along:

If you are a jogging enthusiast, a few days of menstruation should not deter you from your woosah gaining mechanism. Jogging not only helps ease your period problems but also boosts your metabolism while giving you an inexpensive way to look beyond the four walls of your room.

jogging

3. Swim for it:

If you’re a natural water baby, unhesitatingly go take a dip in the pool. Swimming during your period is a taboo that must be brushed aside immediately. Just ensure you wear a reliable tampon and a snug swimsuit so that you don’t leave the pool looking like a scene from Jaws.

Even though exercise looks like a great way to beat the period blues, there are some things you need to keep in mind before you muster up your energy and start with those jumping jacks.

Can Exercise Take Its Toll On Your Period?

Strenuous and vigorous exercise for an extended period of time can adversely impact your menstrual cycle.

1. It Can Delay The Onset Of Menstruation

Girls who start athletic training before menarche (the start of the first period) start their periods later than those who are less physically active.4 This is not really an alarming health concern.

2. It Can Lead To Amenorrhea

Female athletes can suffer from amenorrhea, a condition in which menstruation is absent. Exercising too much can significantly lower you body fat composition, which can lead to amenorrhoea.5 The lack of body fat as well as the excess of it can cause irregular periods or no period at all.

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Not getting your periods does sound like something you’d wish for, but it can cause bone loss making you susceptible to fractures (getting your periods sounds like a better option any given day).6

What Is The Final Verdict?

The crimson tide should not drown your healthy and active lifestyle. You can definitely put on your running shoes or yoga pants (or whatever makes you comfortable) and break into a sweat. There is no such thing as a bad workout while on your period, but moderation is key. Listen to your body, eat healthy, and maintain a healthy body weight. You will be good to go!

References   [ + ]

1.Victoria J. Harber, John R. Sutton. Endorphins And Exercise. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. 1984
2.Andrew C. Hartwig. Peripheral Beta Endorphin and Pain Modulation. Anesthesia Progress. 1991
3.Zahra Rakshaee. Effect of Three Yoga Poses (Cobra, Cat and Fish Poses) in Women with Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Journal Of Pediatric And Adoloscent Gynecology. 2011.
4. Tina Dušek. Influence of High Intensity Training on Menstrual Cycle Disorders in Athletes. Croatian Medical Journal. 2001.
5.Carlberg K. A., Buckman M.T., Peake G.T., Riedesel M. L. Body composition of oligo/amenorrheic athletes. 1983
6.Biller, Beverly M. K. M.D.; Klibanski, Anne M.D. Amenorrhea and Osteoporosis.Current Opinion In Endocrinology, Diabetes, And Obesity. 1991
CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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