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Is Bleeding After Sex During Pregnancy Safe?

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Any vaginal bleeding during pregnancy can be a cause for concern. The source of the blood could be the vagina, cervix, or uterus. Vaginal blood may be due to excessively rough intercourse, vaginal infection, or vaginal dryness and friction.

One of the major concerns for most women is whether it’s safe to have sex during pregnancy or if any particular trimester the right time.

Which Trimester Is Ideal For Sex?

For most pregnant women, it is safe to have sex during pregnancy in any trimester. However, there are always some exceptions. Women with the following conditions should consult their doctor or avoid sex during pregnancy:

  1. Preterm labor or a preterm birth in a previous pregnancy: Here, intercourse (along with nipple stimulation, orgasm, and semen) can lead to uterine contractions and potentially increase the risk of early labor.
  2. Placental previa or Placenta abruption
  3. Early dilation of your cervix
  4. Your water breaks

When Should You Be Concerned?

Blood from the cervix may indicate a friable cervix, an infection, or even cervical cancer. Blood from the uterus may be an indicator of a miscarriage, uterine infection, placenta previa (placenta sits low over the birth canal), or placental abruption (the placenta detaches from the wall of the uterus before or during labor).1 2 3

Signs Of Placenta Previa

  • Painless bleeding during the third trimester of pregnancy
  • Premature contractions of the uterus
  • The uterus measures larger than it should
  • Breech or transverse position of the baby

Signs Of Placenta Abruption

  • Vaginal bleeding (although in about 20% of cases, there is none)
  • Abnormalities of the fetal heart rate
  • Pain or tenderness in the area of the uterus
  • Rapid uterine contractions

Bleeding very early in the pregnancy may be implantation bleeding, which is not at all a cause for concern; however, it is always best to have any bleeding during pregnancy investigated by your doctor or midwife.

Go to the emergency room immediately if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms during pregnancy, which could be indicating serious problems:

  • Severe pain or intense abdominal cramps
  • Severe bleeding, whether or not there is pain
  • Fever greater than 100.4 degree Fahrenheit or 38 degree Celsius
  • Tissue coming from the vagina
  • Dizziness or fainting

What Precautions Can You Take?

Ideally, you should not have the most vigorous sex of your life during pregnancy or force anything too deep into the vagina. The cervix can be a little more delicate during pregnancy, so there may be a bit of spotting after intercourse. However, the bleeding should not be like a period. There also may be a bit of cramping after intercourse during pregnancy. But if you are concerned because of any of these, please consult your doctor.

References   [ + ]

1.Gruca-Stryjak, Karolina, Mariola Ropacka-Lesiak, and Grzegorz Breborowicz. “[Placenta percreta–a severe obstetric complication despite correct diagnosis–a case report].” Ginekologia polska 86, no. 12 (2015): 951-956.
2.Romero, Roberto, Juan Pedro Kusanovic, Tinnakorn Chaiworapongsa, and Sonia S. Hassan. “Placental bed disorders in preterm labor, preterm PROM, spontaneous abortion and abruptio placentae.” Best practice & research Clinical obstetrics & gynaecology 25, no. 3 (2011): 313-327.
3.Tita, Alan TN, and William W. Andrews. “Diagnosis and management of clinical chorioamnionitis.” Clinics in perinatology 37, no. 2 (2010): 339-354.
Pamela Frank
Star Expert

I believe in addressing the root of any health problem through diet, stress reduction, exercise and specific vitamins. minerals, amino acids, herbs and other natural supplements to provide lasting health improvement to my patients.

Pamela Frank
Star Expert

I believe in addressing the root of any health problem through diet, stress reduction, exercise and specific vitamins. minerals, amino acids, herbs and other natural supplements to provide lasting health improvement to my patients.

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