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How To Stop Giving In To Sugary Temptations

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Craving chocolate when sad doesn't make you a sugar addict. Your urge is natural since sugar relieves pain. To control your cravings, enlist the sweet foods you like (cake, cookies, etc.) and their flavors (butterscotch, vanilla, etc.). Note how your five senses react to them, and how, when, and where an urge is triggered (say, by a memory). Identify the pattern and dissociate from it.

They say that the universe brings you what you need. For the most part, I agree. I’ve had several people contact me with the same concern or question. I’m addicted to sugar, how can tapping help? And today I want to be specific — I want to be clear. Most people aren’t truly addicted to sugar.

You Are Not Addicted To Sugar

Are you eating sugar straight from the 5 lb bag by the fistful? (Been there, done that.) No, most people are attracted to things that also have sugar in them. Of all the people I’ve ever worked with, I think I was the only one who ever went straight for sugar right out of the bag.

A little science here: sugar has been shown, in research, to act like an analgesic — a pain reliever.1 The little geek in me wonders if we had already figured that out — sans the science — and that’s why we prefer sweet treats when we are in emotional pain.

What’s The Common Denominator?

What type of foods do you get attracted to? Chocolate? Citrus? Crunchy? Chewy? Creamy? Salt and sweet? Cakes? Cookies? Ice Cream? Store-bought? Homemade? Narrow it down, as best you can, to the things that seem to attract you the most, because now you’ll have something to work with.

What does that citrus tart flavor and sensation remind you of? What do those chocolate chips make you think of? What does the sound of that wrapper crackling as it opens remind you of?

Did you only get those snack cakes when you went to your best friend’s house? Did you get chocolate chip cookies when you went to Grandma’s? Did you only get ice cream when Mom was sad after a break up?

Make Your List

Make a list of:

  • All the foods you are attracted too.
  • All the aspects of those foods (use your five senses)
  • The who, what, where, and when of the cravings, urges, and attractions.

Find what’s common, and then tap. If specific memories or events come up, tap.

References   [ + ]

1.Kracke, George R., Katherine A. Uthoff, and Joseph D. Tobias. “Sugar solution analgesia: the effects of glucose on expressed mu opioid receptors.” Anesthesia & Analgesia 101, no. 1 (2005): 64-68.
Christy Hall

Christy Hall is a Whole Health and Wellness Transformational Coach, a Certified NLP and Certified FasterEFT Practitioner who helps clients solve emotional issues around food, stress, addiction, weight loss, nutrition, and lifestyle changes. She approaches wellness and weight loss from a place of understanding, having struggled with weight issues for a majority of her life. Now that she’s operating from a place of health herself, she offers coaching, consulting, and therapy in order to help clients in their journeys toward wellness.

Christy Hall

Christy Hall is a Whole Health and Wellness Transformational Coach, a Certified NLP and Certified FasterEFT Practitioner who helps clients solve emotional issues around food, stress, addiction, weight loss, nutrition, and lifestyle changes. She approaches wellness and weight loss from a place of understanding, having struggled with weight issues for a majority of her life. Now that she’s operating from a place of health herself, she offers coaching, consulting, and therapy in order to help clients in their journeys toward wellness.

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