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Here’s How Sugar Is Feeding Your Cancer

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Ladies and gentlemen, put your donuts and cookies aside, and let’s talk about how sugar feeds your cancer. Yes, sugar is bad for your cancer, as cancer loves sugar, and we certainly don’t like cancer.

Several studies and researches have come to a mutual conclusion, that consuming more sugar can raise the risks of cancer, especially breast cancer. Though we have come across many doctors stating that it doesn’t matter what you eat after you are diagnosed with cancer, but the truth suggests the opposite. Along with tobacco, an unhealthy diet, and lack of exercise, a Western style diet is a major risk factor for many types of cancer.

Various researches also show that consumption of refined sugar is one of the few things which feeds your cancer, and makes it worse. Those patients who eat more sugary foods are more likely to have advanced cancer.1

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But how does this work?

As we know that table sugar is composed of two sugars, glucose and fructose. Fructose is processed more by the liver, while the glucose in the pancreas. Studies show that cancer thrives on fructose; fructose is the driver of the tumorigenic process. Though any sugar can make your cancer bad, fructose makes it worse.

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What are the foods that make your cancer bad?

Sweetened soft drinks are the largest single source of sugar in the Western diet. A WHO study says that we get no more than 5% of calories from sugar. Processed sugar kills a large number of people across the world every year than we can imagine.

So the solution to the problem? Switch to fruits for natural sugars and a nutritious meal. You will find that almost all the fruits ward off some or the other kind of cancer for sure.

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So what are you waiting for?

References   [ + ]

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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