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Can Your Height Define Your Health Risks?

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Melanoma, thyroid, kidney, breast, colon and rectum cancers in particular, are strongly associated with height. Women who are 5'10" are about 30-40% more likely to develop some cancer than women who are under 5'2". Also, people of smaller stature are more likely to suffer from stroke and cardiovascular disease.

It’s not just the habits and different lifestyle that are connected to one’s health. But, turns out, there is also a complex connection between your health and height. Evidently, an extra inch of difference in your height might benefit you in a lot of ways but at the same time it may also put you in some health risks.

Does Your Height Effect Your Health?

One of the experts in the subject reportedly says that Melanoma, thyroid, kidney, breast, colon, and rectum cancers, in particular, are strongly associated with height. Moreover, according to one study, women who are 5’10” are about 30 to 40% more likely to develop some cancer than women who are 5’2″.

The reason behind it is that taller women tend to have larger organs and more cells, so the chance of developing mutations that lead to cancer is greater. Moreover, it’s also quite possible that hormones and growth factors that influence height might also affect cancer risk.

Another research reveals that if you’re 5’2″ or under and your weight is normal or close to it, you’re three times less likely to get a blood clot.

On the other hand, another research found that women who are 5’8″ are 28% less likely to develop heart disease than those who are 5’3″. While woman who is 5’7″ is about 50% less likely to die from dementia than one who is 5’1″. Moms-to-be who are 5’6″ are 18 to 59% less likely to develop gestational diabetes than those who are 5’2″.

Also, people of smaller stature are more likely to suffer from stroke and cardiovascular disease. And with Alzheimer’s disease, one study found that men who were taller than 5′ 10″ were 59% less likely to develop the disease than men who were shorter than 5′ 6″.

Note: Genetic factors that make you tall or short might also bring out the changes in the body that increase the risk for certain diseases.

Edited By: Vivek Chhetri

 

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

Post a Comment
Rahul Kumar
Rahul Kumar 5pts

i think greater heights means good health

Amy Taylor
Amy Taylor 5pts

With!! You should really visit more. :>

Amy Taylor
Amy Taylor 5pts

At last!! I'm the height of a lawn gnome, but I am immortal!!