Quantcast
CONTINUE READING

6 Fruits To Get Rid Of Your Belly Fat

Bookmark

by

Most of us have the dreaded spare tire around our tummy. Sometimes we stop breathing and suck it in. Other times, we pat our belly for comfort, or make shapes with it when no one’s looking. Let’s not even talk about how thin shirts are designed to be bulge-unfriendly.

But the truth is, your waistline matters.

Unlike any other fat on your body, abdominal fat aka visceral fat has been linked to heart disease, diabetes, asthma, and other metabolic disturbances.1

Here are 6 fruits to deal with our wobbly bits.

1. Avocados

1-avocados

If you aren’t on the avocado bandwagon yet, you are missing out a great deal. Health experts are crowning avocados as the greatest source of nutrients since drinking water. The benefits of eating avocado include reducing inflammation, lowering cholesterol, fighting free radicals, and boosting general health. Avocados are packed with vitamins K, C, E, B5 and B6 (phew!), and they have been found to have more potassium than bananas.

Besides a dozen benefits, a research also proves that eating avocados on a regular basis, helps to reduce weight, specifically the hanging bulge around the tummy.2 This is because avocados are high in fiber and low in carbs, making the fruit weight-loss friendly.

The best part of avocados are that it’s easy to make it part of your diet. You could have them on toast, or mash it for a guacamole dip, or slice them for your salads.

2. Berries

2-berries

Berries are an amazing source of fiber and nutrients that gets your fat burning. The high fiber content helps to keep your tummy to stay full for sometime, and this prevents you from overeating. Blueberries and raspberries provide a boost to your metabolism, thanks to an ingredient known as anthocyanin.

One research conducted on laboratory rats reveals that consuming blueberries for 90 days helped to reduce abdominal fat. The results also included lower triglycerides, lower cholesterol, and improved fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity.3

A cup of blueberries has about 84 calories per cup, while blackberries are 62 calories, and raspberries scores with 64 calories per cup. Think of all the possibilities to satisfy a sweet tooth without hurting your weighing scale.

You could snack on a bowl of berries in between meals, or as part of your oatmeal, or even with yogurt. Follow your palate!

3. Pomegranates

3-pomegranates

Pomegranates are high in antioxidants. These antioxidants help to increase your metabolic rate. With a rise in metabolic rate, you tend to burn more fat as a result. Pomegranate juice has been found to be more beneficial for weight loss and to reduce the muffin top you carry. One research revealed that participants who consumed pomegranate juice for a month were found to be less prone to developing fat cells around the tummy.4 You could have a glass of pomegranate juice with a meal.

A word of caution: If you feel slightly nauseous or uncomfortable, you may want to skip out on pomegranate juice. People with a sensitive stomach should probably avoid pomegranate seeds.

4. Apples and pears

4-apples-and-pears

Apples and pears are loaded with fiber. Both these fruits contain a component known as pectin. This is a water dissolvable fiber that blocks fat retention. This alone would help promote weight loss. But these fruits are not only about their high fiber content. Eating a complete apple can keep your stomach full for a long time.

Not to mention they are easy to carry around, and you could have them anywhere without getting judgmental stares. You can’t really sit in a park with an avocado.

5. Oranges

5-oranges

Oranges are an excellent (and yum) source of vitamin C. This vitamin is responsible for a lot of important functions in your body. It boosts your immune system by giving protection from cardiovascular disease, eye disease, stroke, and even reducing early signs of aging.

While vitamin C doesn’t cause any really weight loss, it definitely influences how much you weigh. This particular vitamin is required to produce molecules that are used for metabolism. If you’re low on vitamin C, your body wouldn’t be able to decide what to do with stored fat. This causes a buildup of fat around the abdominal area.

One study pointed out that people with adequate levels of vitamin C oxidize 30% more fat during a moderate exercise bout than individuals with low vitamin C status.5

6. Grapefruits
6-grapefruits

Besides being another source of vitamin C, grapefruits are blessed with antioxidants. Naringenin, a type of antioxidant, helps to even out insulin levels. Also, grapefruits have a high water percent. One research found out when obese adults ate half a grapefruit or consumed grapefruit juice before meals, they had a decrease in body weight and waist circumference.6

Keep in mind, it would be a better choice to eat the whole fruit, rather than juicing it. Juicing tends to remove the fiber content. Just cut a grapefruit in half, and grab a spoon.

References   [ + ]

1.Björntorp, P. “Visceral fat accumulation: the missing link between psychosocial factors and cardiovascular disease?.” Journal of internal medicine 230, no. 3 (1991): 195-201.
2.Fulgoni, Victor L., Mark Dreher, and Adrienne J. Davenport. “Avocado consumption is associated with better diet quality and nutrient intake, and lower metabolic syndrome risk in US adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001–2008.” Nutrition journal 12, no. 1 (2013): 1.
3.Vuong, T., A. Benhaddou-Andaloussi, A. Brault, D. Harbilas, L. C. Martineau, D. Vallerand, C. Ramassamy, C. Matar, and P. S. Haddad. “Antiobesity and antidiabetic effects of biotransformed blueberry juice in KKAy mice.” International journal of obesity 33, no. 10 (2009): 1166-1173.
4.Al-Dujaili, Emad AS. “Consumption of Pomegranate Juice Attenuates Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress, Blood Pressure and Urinary Cortisol/Cortisone Ratio in Human Adults.” EC Nutrition 4, no. 6 (2016): 982-995.
5.Johnston, Carol S. “Strategies for healthy weight loss: from vitamin C to the glycemic response.” Journal of the American College of Nutrition 24, no. 3 (2005): 158-165.
6.Silver, Heidi J., Mary S. Dietrich, and Kevin D. Niswender. “Effects of grapefruit, grapefruit juice and water preloads on energy balance, weight loss, body composition, and cardiometabolic risk in free-living obese adults.” Nutrition & metabolism 8, no. 1 (2011): 1.
CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

FURTHER READING