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11 Foods For Better Eyesight

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From cell phones to computers, our world is full of glowing screens. So you might be concerned about your eye health. Plus, it’s common for eyes to get worse with age.

11 Foods For Better Eyesight

To improve your eyesight, include these nine foods in your diet.

1. Carrots

Carrots are good for eyes

 

Carrots are packed with beta-carotene, a carotenoid that creates hue. This compound is also a precursor to vitamin A. And since it’s a powerful antioxidant, it can stop oxidative damage and reduce your risk of age-related degeneration.1 No wonder these veggies are called “X-ray vision carrots”! Try them as a snack with hummus or herby yogurt dip.

2. Sweet Potato

Sweet potatoes has beta-carotene and vitamin A helps retina to function better

Sweet potatoes are also full of beta-carotene and vitamin A. Without these nutrients, the retina wouldn’t be able to function properly. They’re important for adaptation to dim light and darkness, too. And since this nutrient stimulates cell growth, it improves your eye health.2 These are some good reasons to ditch starchy white potatoes. To eat more sweet potatoes, make baked fries or hash browns.

3. Squash

Squash helps to see better at lower lighting

The vibrant color of squash means that it’s rich in vitamin A. If you want better vision, have squash. It will also help you see better in lower lighting.3 Relatives of squash, like pumpkins, also count. For a delicious and healthy dessert, make a pie with squash or pumpkin.

4. Kale

Kale helps to protect eye cataracts

For more antioxidants, chow down on kale. This green leafy veggie has two powerful carotenoids called lutein and zeaxanthin. These protect your eyes against cataracts, a condition that develops when the eye’s proteins become damaged. It also causes your lens to become cloudy. Fortunately, carotenoids can lower your risk.4 It works great in smoothies and salads.

5. Spinach

anti oxidants in spinach makes eye health better

Like kale, spinach is a dark green leafy vegetable that has lutein and zeaxanthin. It also contains vitamin C, another antioxidant that can help boost your eye health. Together, these nutrients can ward off cataracts. And even if you already have them, vitamin C will slow down the progression.5

6. Oranges

oranges benefit the retina

Oranges are rich in another carotenoid called beta-cryptoxanthin. It provides antioxidant defense while promoting awesome eyesight. And since it’s a precursor of vitamin A, the retina will benefit.6 It’s a pretty good reason to make some fresh orange juice.

7. Persimmons

11 Foods For Better Eyesight

Beta-cryptoxanthin can also be found in persimmons, a sweet and fragrant fruit. But since it’s not very common, you might have never had one! The benefits of persimmons for your eye are good enough to make you try them. You can eat it by itself or add it to smoothies.

8. Nuts

nut helps to get rid of growing and new cataracts thus promotes eye health

Nuts can also make your eyesight amazing. It’s loaded with vitamin E, zinc, and essential fatty acids – all of which can benefit your eye. You’ll have protection against growing cataracts while stopping new ones.7 The zinc in nuts can also decrease the risk of age-related macular degeneration.8 To eat more nuts, make a trail mix or homemade granola bars. You can even toss them into salads and pasta.

9. Salmon

omega 3 fatty acids in salmon contribute to better eye health

Salmon is one of the healthiest meats you can eat. The omega-3 fatty acids in it will enhance your eye health and make it better.9 Specifically, it does this by increasing the regrowth of vessels in the retina.10 Omega-3s can also work with zinc, vitamin C, and vitamin E to fight macular degeneration. To reap the benefits, add salmon to a salad made with the veggies on this list.

10. Eggs

11 Foods For Better Eyesight

Love egg salad? You’re in luck. Lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamin A, and zinc can all be found in eggs. This food is also packed with protein, so they’ll keep you full for a long time. To incorporate more eggs into your diet, make a batch of hard-boiled eggs at the beginning of each week. They’ll be ready for breakfasts, salads, and sandwiches over the next few days.11

11. Dairy Products

Dairy products helps us against vision loss

Eating dairy products will also boost your vitamin A and zinc intake. 12 Together, these will give you, even more, protection against vision loss. Healthy dairy choices include fortified low-fat or skim milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt.

Wearing sunglasses is another great way to protect your eyesight. You should also take breaks when working on the computer. These habits will help maintain your eye health, even as you get older.

References   [ + ]

1. Beta-carotene, MedlinePlus
2. Vitamin A, Oregon State University
3. Vitamin A, MedlinePlus
4, 5, 7. Nutrition and Cataracts, American Optometric Association
6. Burri, Betty J. Beta-cryptoxanthin as a source of vitamin A. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 95.9(2015):1786-1794.
8. Zinc, American Optometric Association
9. Eye Health Tips ,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
10. Connor, Kip M., John Paul SanGiovanni, Chatarina Lofqvist, Christopher M. Aderman, Jing Chen, Akiko Higuchi, Song Hong, Elke A. Pravda, Sharon Majchrzak, Deborah Carper, Ann Hellstrom, Jing X. Kang, Emily Y. Chew, Norman Salem, Jr., Charles N Serhan and Lois E.H. Smith. “Increased dietary intake of omega-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids reduces pathological retinal angiogenesis.” Nature Medicine 13(2007):868-873.
11. Missimer Amanda, Diana M. DiMarco, Catherine J. Andersen, Ana Gabriela Murillo, Marcela Vergara-Jimenez, and Maria Luz Fernandez. Consuming Two Eggs per Day, as Compared to an Oatmeal Breakfast, Decreases Plasma Ghrelin while Maintaining the LDL/HDL Ratio. Nutrients 9.2(2017):89.
12. Vitamin A, National Institutes of Health
CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.