Quantcast
CONTINUE READING

Choose A Diet Based On Your Blood Type To Fight Fatigue

Bookmark

by
3 Min Read

Type O should avoid dairy, wheat and consume lean meat, cold-water fish, and green tea. Type A should avoid animal proteins and fresh milk, limit grains, and include cold-water fish in their diet. Type B should avoid wheat, corn, peanuts, chicken and include lean organic meat and yogurt. Type AB should avoid red meat, chicken, corn flour and consume soy and seafood.

We all deal with fatigue differently, and many of our bodies’ responses are based on our unique, individual biochemistry.

The Blood Type Diet provides an individualized plan for optimizing health and wellness. I’ve tailored four specific protocols as targeted support for individuals who experience deep fatigue as a primary or secondary health concern.

Following these guidelines will provide additional support to overcome fatigue by strengthening your immune system and improving metabolic and cellular fitness.

Fatigue-Fighting Diet Checklists

Blood Type O

  • Eat small to moderate portions of high-quality, lean, organic, grass-fed meat several times a week for strength.
  • Include regular portions of richly oiled cold-water fish.
  • Consume little or no dairy foods.
  • Eliminate wheat and wheat-based products from your diet.
  • Limit your intake of beans principally to those that are BENEFICIAL.
  • Eat lots of BENEFICIAL fruits and vegetables.
  • Avoid stimulants found in caffeine (coffee, colas, etc.).
  • Avoid coffee, but drink green tea every day.

Blood Type A

  • Avoid or limit animal proteins.
  • Derive your primary protein from plant foods with seafood used occasionally.
  • Seafood should be primarily richly oiled cold-water fish.
  • Include modest amounts of cultured dairy foods in your diet, but avoid fresh milk products.
  • Don’t overdo the grains, especially wheat-derived foods.
  • Eat lots of BENEFICIAL fruits and vegetables, especially those high in antioxidants and fiber.
  • Drink green tea every day for extra immune system benefits.

Blood Type B

  • Eat small-to-moderate portions of high-quality, lean, organic meat (especially goat, lamb, and mutton) several times a week for strength, energy, and digestive health.
  • Avoid Chicken.
  • Include regular portions of richly oiled cold-water fish.
  • Regularly eat cultured dairy foods, such as yogurt and kefir, which are beneficial for digestive health.
  • Eliminate wheat and corn from your diet.
  • Eat lots of BENEFICIAL fruits and vegetables.
  • If you need a daily dose of caffeine, replace coffee with green tea.
  • Avoid foods that are Type B red flags, especially chicken, corn, buckwheat, peanuts, soybeans, lentils, potatoes, and tomatoes.

Blood Type AB

  • Derive your protein primarily from sources other than red meat.
  • Eliminate chicken from your diet.
  • Eat soy foods and seafood as your primary protein.
  • Include modest amounts of cultured dairy foods in your diet, but limit fresh milk products.
  • Don’t overdo the grains, especially wheat-derived foods.  Avoid corn flour altogether.
  • Eat lots of BENEFICIAL fruits and vegetables, especially those high in antioxidants and fiber.
  • Avoid coffee, but drink two to three cups of green tea every day.
Peter D'Adamo ND

Dr. Peter D’Adamo is a naturopathic physician and the author of the NY Times best seller, Eat Right 4 Your Type, which advanced the idea that blood types play a vital role in optimal health and well-being. Dr. D’Adamo is the founder of the Center of Excellence in Generative Medicine at the University of Bridgeport in CT, and he serves as a Distinguished Professor of Clinical Studies at the University of Bridgeport College of Naturopathic Medicine.

Peter D'Adamo ND

Dr. Peter D’Adamo is a naturopathic physician and the author of the NY Times best seller, Eat Right 4 Your Type, which advanced the idea that blood types play a vital role in optimal health and well-being. Dr. D’Adamo is the founder of the Center of Excellence in Generative Medicine at the University of Bridgeport in CT, and he serves as a Distinguished Professor of Clinical Studies at the University of Bridgeport College of Naturopathic Medicine.

FURTHER READING