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Doctors Find Feather In 7-Month-Old Kansas Girl’s Neck

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Babies tend to put all kinds of things in their mouths, some of us may even be one of those naughty toddlers that was curious about the taste of mud, play dough or even a few creepy crawlies.1

But, moving on from that, more recently, in Kansas, the parents of 7-month-old Mya Whittington, started to panic when they saw a golf-ball sized bump sticking out of their little girl’s neck, right below her jaw.

In shock Mya’s parents, Emma and Aaron Whittington, rushed her to the hospital, to which doctors diagnosed it to be just a swollen gland.

Feeling a bit relieved but still anxious, they got back home. And around two days later, whatever it was in Mya’s neck, started to stick out from that lump.

Her parents had to rush her back to the hospital, this time to a bigger one in Wichita, and doctors pulled that protruding stem out to discover that it was a 2-inch long feather lodged in little Mya’s neck.

Mya’s father was bewildered that his little girl put a feather in her mouth. He said it must have eventually got stuck in her throat, but the body being intelligent as it is, rejected it and forced it out of her neck.

Doctors said that the feather was probably in Mya’s neck for quite a long time, maybe months. Although, this sounds like an excruciatingly painful experience, Mya’s parents said she never made a fuss or cried or showed any signs of discomfort, only until the lump appeared and the nurses tried to inspect it.

Mya is now back to being a happy little baby, with the only remnants of that experience being a little healing bump on her neck and hearing about this crazy story from her parents, when she grows up.

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CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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