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Do You Curse? It Shows That You’re F****** Smart!

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What is common between you and Jennifer Lawrence? Yes, we just compared you with the Hollywood bombshell. Well, the common trait she and you share is the skill to curse like a sailor. If you do, you might be f** genius, as your creativity and grade of curses and insults could actually prove you to be a grammar nazi.

To put it across in simple terms, those who curse often, and to the glory, actually have a better grip on their language than those who choose not to “beep”.1

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According to a study published by a journal, it’s stated that your swearing tendencies improves your language fluency. Various known psychologists, experts in how we humans use our language, took part in a rather interesting experiment where participants of ages 18 and 22 were asked to blurt out as many curse words as they could think of in a given amount of time. They recited many animal names too; “stupid cow”, “porcupine on a stick”, “son of a woot”, and so many.

The psychologists found that people with an R-rated tongue, regardless of gender, had larger vocabularies. Unfortunately, it is a taboo language, and it’s a common assumption that people who swear often are lazy and don’t have adequate vocabulary. Or how it’s mostly said, “they are buggers.”

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But, the study also mentions that people who use only limited terms like f*, as***, s***, are actually no better than the clean mouthed ones. Your verbal knowledge vasts your insults and curses. The more amount of words you know, the more you can create insults and curses.

So, you’ve got a f*** awesome news to tell your parents tonight.

References   [ + ]

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.