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Pain In The Neck? Have You Tried Chiropractic Yet?

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Treat neck pain with spinal manipulation. The mobilization technique with its low-amplitude, high-velocity thrusts, targets specific vertebrae and restores movement in stiff parts of your spine. It is less forceful and relaxes the muscles. It involves gentle pulling of the neck and gliding massages. Trigger-point therapy is used to ease tight muscle knots by applying consistent pressure.

We all know what it’s like to have neck pain — whether it’s after a long drive, pinching the phone between the head and shoulder, stargazing, or from talking to someone who is seated off to the side. There are many causes of neck pain, but the question of the month is, how do chiropractic adjustments help neck pain? Let’s take a look!

What Is Chiropractic?

Chiropractic, broken down into its fundamental Greek derivatives, means “hand” (cheir) and “action” (praxis). The profession of chiropractic began in the later 1800s and has grown in popularity ever since.

There is now an overwhelming body of evidence that supports spinal manipulation as both a safe and a highly effective treatment for neck and back pain, headaches, and many other maladies. Joint manipulation is not new; it can, in fact, be traced back to as early as 400 BCE.

Common Techniques To Treat Neck Pain

1. Spinal Manipulation

The technique most often associated with chiropractic is spinal manipulation where a high-velocity, low-amplitude thrust is applied to specific vertebrae in the spine, which does several things:

  • It restores mobility in an area with restricted movement.
  • It stimulates the sensory neuroreceptors in joint capsules, which has a muscle-relaxing reflex effect.
  • It can affect surrounding neurological structures in certain parts of the spine, such as the parasympathetic (cranial and sacral regions) and sympathetic (mid-back) nervous systems, which can have beneficial effects on the digestive system, cardiovascular system, and other body systems not typically thought about when we seek chiropractic care.

2. Mobilization

There are many different types of manual therapies that chiropractors utilize when caring for neck-pain patients. The low-velocity, low-amplitude or non-thrust techniques, which do NOT produce the “crack” that is frequently associated with chiropractic adjustments, is often referred to as mobilization.

Mobilization often incorporates a combination of manual traction (pulling of the neck) and left-to-right and front-to-back “gliding” movements, usually starting lightly and gradually increasing the pressure as tolerated.

In many cases, a doctor of chiropractic may utilize a combination of manipulation and mobilization as well as “trigger-point therapy” (applying sustained pressure over tight “knots” in muscles), depending on a patient’s needs.

Dr. Blake Kalkstein DC, MS, CCSP, TPI, ART

While earning his D.C. degree, Dr. Blake worked as a chiropractic intern at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Hospital in Bethesda, MD where he had the privilege to work in the amputee rehabilitation center. Dr. Blake’s post graduate sports medicine internship with John’s Hopkins Sports Medicine orthopedic surgeons allowed him to observe all types of injuries. Guidance from Dr. John Wilckens, team orthopedist for the Baltimore Orioles and his internship supervisor, led Dr. Blake to better understand advanced orthopedic and sports injuries and ways to appropriately manage each condition.

Dr. Blake Kalkstein DC, MS, CCSP, TPI, ART

While earning his D.C. degree, Dr. Blake worked as a chiropractic intern at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Hospital in Bethesda, MD where he had the privilege to work in the amputee rehabilitation center. Dr. Blake’s post graduate sports medicine internship with John’s Hopkins Sports Medicine orthopedic surgeons allowed him to observe all types of injuries. Guidance from Dr. John Wilckens, team orthopedist for the Baltimore Orioles and his internship supervisor, led Dr. Blake to better understand advanced orthopedic and sports injuries and ways to appropriately manage each condition.