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Cardio Yourself To Weight Loss

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If you are one of those ‘ignorance is bliss sorts,’ it’s time you understand this. Weight loss is not determined by the reading on the weighing scale. It is determined by the number of calories you burn and, hence, the amount of unhealthy body fat you lose. Your weight may remain the same despite you burning fat. That’s ’cause you probably made up for it with new built muscle.

The moment we buckle our jeans is when most of us reminisce about slimmer, fitter days. Has the desire to vivaciously burn off the excess unwanted fat (temporarily) overpowered you?

Time, space, and money are important factors for those raring to plunge into intense fat-burning cardiovascular workouts. The thing about cardio is that it is fun and doesn’t depend on equipment. As long as you keep it fun and try different types of workouts, you will be able to easily resist the need for cheat days. Play around with speed and intensity of workouts on different days of the week.

Why cardio?

Cardio releases ‘feel good’ hormones while spiking your metabolism. Diabetics can even gain better control over their condition.

Benefits

But does cardio help you lose fat?

Cardio will help you lose fat only if you create a calorie deficit. Most people falsely (proudly) believe they are creating this deficit, when in reality they just eat back what they burn.

Despite there being a constant debate over LISS (low intensity steady state) training and HIIT (high intensity interval training), what matters at the end of the day is how many calories you burnt in total and whether that was enough to create a calorie deficit.

Here’s some cardio that you can effortlessly incorporate in your schedule:

Walking: Aim for around 7000 steps a day. For each kilometer you walk, you burn as many calories of your body weight in kilograms (approx.).

Running: Run at least 2-3 hours a week. As is obvious, it produces results faster than walking.

Swimming: This is a refreshing form of cardio. Unlike most cardio that focuses on your lower body, it focuses more on your upper body.

Sprinting: 5-10 sprints twice a week are a good start. If you have an injury, take necessary caution.

Jumping rope: This fun childhood activity can go a long way in helping you achieve your fitness goals.

Need to spice it up even more? (Aren’t you demanding?)

Ride mountain bikes, play sports, hike, shadow box, dance, practise step aerobics, etc.

Don’t get thrown off track by rumors of the interference effect that suggests that cardio interferes with the process of building strength, power, and muscle mass. While there is some truth in it, it is exaggerated. As long as you don’t overdo cardio, you are safe.

Here is a workout you can follow at your own convenience in the comfort of your home.

Free hand is the way to go. No equipment needed, only dedication. Repeat the circuit 5 times for a 20 minute workout.

Workout

Have you ever wondered where all of that burnt fat went?

Well, 80% of it is exhaled as carbon dioxide. Imagine that! From your tummy through your mouth to the atmosphere. Intriguing isn’t it?

You must always eat right whether striving to lose weight or not.

What you eat before and after your workout matters.

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Disclaimer

Those suffering from heart disease, inflamed joints, or atrophied muscles, those with injuries, those who have undergone surgery, and pregnant women are advised to consult a doctor before attempting any form of cardiovascular exercise.

Whenever you feel demotivated and you ask yourself this question “Why all this effort?” and convince yourself otherwise,…

…envision yourself as a fit, lively old man or woman going for head banging rock concerts rather than weekly doctor’s visits.

A photo posted by Jackie B (@jbarber154) on

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.