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What Can I Do For Smelly Armpits?

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Shower twice during summer or after exercise. Use fresh towels. Use anti-bacterial deodorant soaps. Dust armpits with baking soda after a shower, it neutralizes the sweat. You can also use baby powder. Avoid pungent food like garlic and red meat, stick to a vegetarian diet and hydrate well to keep unpleasant odors at bay. Wear natural breathable fabrics like cotton.

Claude Butler

Curejoy Expert Claude C Butler Explains:

In generally healthy people, it isn’t sweat but bacteria that feed on the fatty sweat, secreted by the apocrine glands found in the armpits, is the culprit for the smelly armpits. Bacteria thrive on the warm and moist conditions releasing foul odor in the process. Getting rid of this bacteria and reducing the sweat they dine on are the only ways to combat this embarrassing problem.

Showering (even twice on hot summer days or after exercise) with antibacterial deodorant soap and wiping clean using freshly laundered towels (bacteria love your damp towels) should be a daily routine. Use Deodorants that not only create an inhospitable environment for bacteria but also leave you smelling good. Antiperspirants on the other hand contain aluminum salts that inhibit the sweat glands from producing sweat, keeping your armpits dry.

A natural time tested remedy is dusting baking soda after a shower, which neutralizes the sweat. Some also use baby powder, supplemented by baby wipes during the day to keep dampness away. Wearing natural-fabric clothes (like cotton/wool) allows your skin to breathe and allows air circulation preventing sweat accumulation. You can also try fitness wear made from breathable synthetic fabrics that absorb moisture from your skin and spread across the fabric where it evaporates quickly. Maintaining personal hygiene by removing or trimming your underarm hair can help sweat from accumulating.

Foods that have a strong aroma (like ginger, garlic, cabbage, vinegar, and spicy curries) contain volatile sulfuric substance that tends to linger in your system and reflect in your sweat. Avoid pungent food and red meat, stick to a vegetarian diet and hydrate well to keep unpleasant odors at bay.

If the problem persists seek medical help as your body odor can be a sign of various medical conditions including liver and kidney disease.

 

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.