Quantcast
CONTINUE READING

Is There A Simple Way To Calculate My BMI?

Bookmark

by
2 Min Read

Divide your weight in kilograms (kg) by your height in meters (m). Next, divide the result by your height again to obtain your BMI. To be at healthy weight, your BMI should fall between 18.4 and 24.9. If your BMI falls below 18.4, you might be underweight, and if it's above 24.9 you may be considered obese. It helps asses your risk of developing chronic diseases.

Body mass index (BMI) is a good way to check if you’re healthy weight for your height. Your BMI can help your doctor assess your overall fitness and determine your risk of developing chronic diseases. Here’s how you could calculate your BMI in a simple way.

Calculating your BMI

– Firstly divide your weight in kilograms (kg) by your height in meters (m). For example, if you weight about 70 kg and your height is 1.52 meters, divide 70 by 1.52. The answer is 46.

– Next divide the result by your height again to get the BMI. So, in this case we divide 46 by 1.52. The result is 30.2. This is ideally your BMI.

According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood institute, to be at healthy weight, your body mass index should fall between 18.4 and 24.9. In case your BMI falls below 18.4 you might be considered under weight and in any case when above 24.9, obese.

Your BMI is very important as it can indicate if your malnourished or more prone to illnesses. High BMIs project increased risk of high bad cholesterol levels, low good cholesterol levels and high triglycerides levels, so knowing your BMI is important long before you are at risk of more serious cardiovascular diseases, the CDC reports.

 

Edited by Pragya Sharoff

 

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

FURTHER READING
Post a Comment
Sarah Rose
Sarah Rose 5pts

No because all bodies are so different with different muscle masses and frames. The traditional bmi chart compensates for very little actual information about your body.