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Bone Broth Breakthrough

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Bone broth is the new kale. Here is a health-boosting bone broth soup recipe - full of critical macro and trace minerals - that is perfect for cozy fall evenings.

Bone broth is the new kale. It is a superfood that has all the rage right now and it is well deserved.

This health-boosting broth is full of critical macro and trace minerals; aminos like glycine, glutamine and immune supporting proline; and collagen to heal your gut, strengthen your bones, and skyrocket your energy – to name just a few of the benefits!

Benefits Of Bone Broth

If you want the digestive and immune boosting benefits of bone broth, you “have” to be drinking bone broth made from a healthy animal (i.e. grass-fed, pasture-raised or wild caught). Only then will you be able to enjoy the many benefits of bone broth, including:

Joint Health

Bone broth contains tons of collagen, the protein that makes up bones, tendons, ligaments and other flexible tissues.

It also contains other proteins like gelatin, proline and glycine and lots of Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), including glucosamine, that are commonly taken as supplements to reduce joint pain and inflammation.

Digestion

The glycine and glutamine – both amino acids found in large quantities in bone broth – this maintains the integrity of the intestinal wall, and helps heal leaky gut.

Healthy Bones

Bone broth contains minerals like magnesium, potassium, and calcium that promotes strong bones.

Enjoy A Bowl At Home!!

Here is a bone broth soup recipe we whipped up in the Fat Flush kitchen recently that is perfect for cozy fall evenings.

Ingredients

  • 3 to 4 pounds of mixed beef bones (short ribs, oxtails, knuckles, and neck bones)
  • 1 tbsp olive oil, avocado or macadamia nut oil
  • 2 medium carrots
  • 3 celery stalks
  • 2 medium yellow onions
  • 2 tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1 bay leaf

Instructions

  1. Prepare the bones: Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Place the bones on a baking tray and drizzle with olive oil.
  2. Roast the bones: Place the tray in the oven, roasting for 30 minutes. Turn the bones, then roast for another 30 minutes.
  3. Prepare the vegetables: Chop the carrots, celery, and onions roughly. You will discard these later, so you do not need to be precise.
  4. Combine broth ingredients: Place the roasted bones, chopped vegetables, bay leaf, and cider vinegar in a large stock pot. Cover with water so that the ingredients are under at least 2 inches of liquid. At this point, you can also add in any other flavoring ingredients that you want in the broth.
  5. Cook the broth: Heat the broth over high heat until it comes to a rapid simmer, then reduce the heat to low. Cover the broth and let it simmer on low for 12 to 24 hours. Skim off the foam on top periodically. You may have to add water occasionally to make sure the ingredients stay covered.
  6. Strain and cool the broth: After the broth has darkened to a rich brown color, remove it from the heat and strain through a fine-mesh sieve. Place the broth in a large container and let it cool to room temperature. Once cooled, place it in the fridge to chill. Scrape off any solidified fat that rises to the top before using.
  7. Reheating bone broth: Reheat your bone broth for a steaming cup you can sip on its own, or use it as a powerful ingredient in your favorite recipes.
Ann Louise Gittleman

Top nutritionist, visionary health expert and bestselling author, Ann Louise Gittleman, PhD, CNS, has always been a trendsetter. Continually breaking new ground in traditional and holistic health, she is internationally recognized as a pioneer in dietary, environmental, and women's health issues and is known as "The First Lady of Nutrition" among her millions of followers worldwide.

Ann Louise Gittleman

Top nutritionist, visionary health expert and bestselling author, Ann Louise Gittleman, PhD, CNS, has always been a trendsetter. Continually breaking new ground in traditional and holistic health, she is internationally recognized as a pioneer in dietary, environmental, and women's health issues and is known as "The First Lady of Nutrition" among her millions of followers worldwide.

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