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Best Way To Consume Water

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Hot water stimulates hunger, aids digestion, soothes throat, cleanses urinary bladder and relieves aggravation of Vata and Kapha doshas. It helps the body get rid of accumulated, undigested food and can soothe pain in the hips and back. Adding cumin, coriander, sandalwood, mint, honey or ginger to water helps with detoxification, metabolism and weight loss.

How Much Water Should I Drink?

For years, most of us have heard the suggestion that the best way to consume water is drink “8 cups of water a day.” Unfortunately it isn’t really that simple. In fact, each of us has a unique constitution and lifestyle that actually has different requirements to stay hydrated. The amount of re-hydration we need on a given day is directly related to how much hydration we have lost through the loss of bodily fluids.

When we eat, we need to sip just enough fluid with our meal to make our food somewhat liquid. In addition, if we can’t digest our water it doesn’t matter how much we drink, we never really get hydrated. It may seem strange to think that we have to digest our water but, just like anything that we swallow, water has to be digested and transformed into a suitable fluid for our body’s nutritional needs. We have probably all had the experience of feeling bloated and overly full after drinking water—this is a sign that it is not being properly transformed.

[Read: 10 Benefits Of Drinking Water On An Empty Stomach]

And that is actually the most important factor. Our body is not like a sponge. Our bodily tissues don’t just immediately soak up the water we drink and suddenly become hydrated. If we drink too much water, just as when we eat too much food, we can dampen our digestive fire. Drinking too little water can also weaken our digestion.

The simplest way to know how much water we should drink is to drink when we are thirsty. Modern nutritionists say this is probably too late, as we are already overly dehydrated by this point—but this may be because most of us have lost touch with the subtle signs of our thirst. It may take some time to redevelop that sensitivity.

In general, all of us will tend to need to drink more water from the middle of summer through the autumn and less from mid-winter through the spring.

When Should I Drink Water?

Again, the best rule of thumb is to drink when you are thirsty.

Drinking cold water (or any cold beverage) constricts the flow of blood to the digestive tract, making digestion more sluggish. By now many of us have heard that we shouldn’t drink beverages with our meal, but when we eat, we do need to sip just enough fluid with our meal to make our food somewhat liquid. This is why many cultures around the world include a small cup of tea or soup with every meal. In some cuisines, it is common to drink a bowl of broth before eating.

One way to start to get in touch with the sensation of thirst is to drink a glass of water large enough to quench your thirst when you wake up. Wait at least an hour before eating breakfast. Then again at least an hour before your next meal (at least 1.5-2 hours after eating) drink a glass of water. If you normally eat 3 meals a day, then repeat this before your next meal. The size of the glass of water should vary, based on what you want to drink at the moment.

Cooking Your Water

Cooking our food and drinks is a process of pre-digestion. This means that our body doesn’t have to work as hard to get benefit from our nourishment. In fact, it makes the nourishment more available to our body.

Using clear spring water or filtered water (tap water is also usually fine), boil it for 10 minutes. This water cooled to room temperature and kept in a covered container is said to be easy to digest and particularly good for soothing inflammatory (Pitta) conditions in the body.

Drinking the boiled water while it is still warm is even more medicinal. Hot water is said to stimulate hunger and aid digestion of food. It is good for the throat, easily digested, and cleanses the urinary bladder. In addition, it relieves hiccups, bloating and aggravation of Vata and Kapha doshas. It can be helpful in reducing fever and easing cough and asthma. It helps the body get rid of accumulated, undigested food and can soothe pain in the hips and back.

In contrast, drinking cold water (or any cold beverage) constricts the flow of blood to the digestive tract, making digestion more sluggish. This is made much worse when the cold beverage is taken with a meal.

[Read: Can Drinking Water Ease My Migraine Headaches?]

Adding Oomph To Your Water

Sometimes it can be helpful to add some spices or herbs to water to make it more absorbable—and more interesting. This is essentially what we are doing when we make tea. Here are some spices that can make your water even more medicinal:

Cumin, Coriander and Fennel Seeds

Add about 5 seeds of each for every ½ c. of water when you are boiling it. Strain out the seeds before drinking. This blend is particularly good for stimulating digestion during gentle cleanses.

Sandalwood, Cardamom or Mint

These cooling herbs can soothe Pitta irritability, especially during the hot summer months. A pinch of powder herb or a few leaves of mint will work nicely. If you are used to drinking hot mint tea, try just putting the mint into cooled water. It has a really nice cooling effect on a hot day!

Honey

Uncooked honey added to cooled water (about a ½ tsp. or so) can be a good aid to weight loss and helps to clear excess Kapha during the spring.

Ginger

A pinch of ginger powder in your morning glass of water enkindles your digestive fire and can be helpful for reducing Vata and Kapha excess.

Gold

Yes, gold. In this case, you are not really adding gold to your water, but just putting gold into the pot with the water when you boil it. It should be 22k or higher. I use a simple gold ring without any stones (gemstones have other effects that may be undesirable). Gold is said to greatly enhance immunity.

Susan Fauman

I have trained classically in Hatha Yoga and Ayurveda for almost 15 years, spending more than 2 years studying in India with Ayurvedic doctors and healers. I am a passionate educator and speaker in college classrooms, yoga studios and at professional conferences. I have training in western and Ayurvedic herbal formulation and in diet and nutrition through the lenses of Ayurveda and classical Taoist medicine. I am also a skilled bodyworker, weaving Shiatsu massage technique into deep-tissue massage and Ayurvedic body treatments.

Susan Fauman

I have trained classically in Hatha Yoga and Ayurveda for almost 15 years, spending more than 2 years studying in India with Ayurvedic doctors and healers. I am a passionate educator and speaker in college classrooms, yoga studios and at professional conferences. I have training in western and Ayurvedic herbal formulation and in diet and nutrition through the lenses of Ayurveda and classical Taoist medicine. I am also a skilled bodyworker, weaving Shiatsu massage technique into deep-tissue massage and Ayurvedic body treatments.

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SusanFauman
SusanFauman 5pts

Just to dropping in on the convo to add a couple of things:

1. @peabody3000 Even setting aside the more esoteric aspects, heating water does, indeed, change it. It makes certain minerals and compounds (such as calcium carbonate), fall out of solution and precipitate to the bottom of a vessel of water when it is heated. In addition, depending upon the vessel the water is heating in (glass vs. ceramic vs. steel vs. copper, etc), some of the molecules of that substance may enter the water or have a chemical reaction with some other substance in the water. And, of course, in places where bacteria may invade the water supply, heating and boiling the water for 10 minutes helps to purify the water.

2. @EllenEubankStaleyHenry Not feeling thirsty until your body is showing signs that you are far past the point of slightly dehydrated is not evidence that this advice is useless, but it might be evidence that you are not tuned in enough to the signals your body is sending. Drinking water on an empty stomach is usually the best way to hydrate a dehydrated system, but there may be other issues which are inhibiting your water absorption, resulting in the feeling of nausea. I would be curious to know if the same thing happens if you drink 8 oz. of mint or fennel tea. These herbs can both greatly improve digestion and ease nausea.

3. @Mandeep Singh Clean, fresh rainwater that is filtered or free of pollution is usually of excellent drinking quality.

peabody3000
peabody3000 5pts

@SusanFauman im talking about the water itself. heating water may change any bacteria within the water, but it does not change the water. precipitation is caused by chilling a solution, such as water containing dissolved solids, not by heating. so one could say that heating water makes it possible for more solids to dissolve into it, but again we're not talking about some inherently beneficial alteration of the water's properties

EllenEubankStaleyHenry
EllenEubankStaleyHenry 5pts

I don't get thirsty till my tongue is sticking to the roof of my mouth and drinking a glass of water first thing in the morning makes me nauseous..  So I find your advice a little...useless.

peabody3000
peabody3000 5pts

water doesn't change at all from being heated. utter nonsense

rionoirble
rionoirble 5pts

This is the biggest load of bullshit I have seen in a while... lolz

RogerGursahani
RogerGursahani 5pts

its the ions of gold that get infused in the water that is what happens on a very microscopic level and yes gold is actually very good for you as it rules vitality and immunity. 

Ron Enfield
Ron Enfield 5pts

Water is water. It does not get digested, but is simply absorbed into the body.

Angel Romo
Angel Romo 5pts

Yes 16 glasses a day as you can it is the best result to make our body healthy and less on cancer..

Ayurveda
Ayurveda 5pts

No, just putting gold into the pot with the water when you boil it

Sandria Wilson
Sandria Wilson 5pts

Thanks for sharing these facts about water. Learned something new

Mandeep Singh
Mandeep Singh 5pts

Interesting topic. Is rain water is suitable to drink

Ayurveda
Ayurveda 5pts

Kunal Mathur Thank you! :)

Ayurveda
Ayurveda 5pts

Glad you have one now! :) Kalyan Koley

Priyanka Nahata Patel
Priyanka Nahata Patel 5pts

can you please suggest an effective remedy for dandruff and dull hair?. it gets greasy in a day or two after wash. Ayurveda

Rena LaRue
Rena LaRue 5pts

I want the gold ring......to put in my tea Not on my finger

Khush Haal Baba
Khush Haal Baba 5pts

Ayurveda Mere Eyes Ke Niche Black Circles Hain . Plz Ap Mujhe Koi Iska Treatment Bata Dijiye . Thank You !!!

Juliet Kilo
Juliet Kilo 5pts

Bummer. I love cold water as it's refreshing.

Suchet Singh Yadav
Suchet Singh Yadav 5pts

It is a research work done by reputed University / Institution. It says that excess drinking of water causes agging faster. It is presumed that water is distilled and the research means that excess water drinking would lead to faster agging. I do not know how the Research Scholar has based his findings on but I will let you know further developments in this regards.

Teri Tinsman McFalls
Teri Tinsman McFalls 5pts

Maybe public water!!!, in which I would never touch anyway! But good well, or distilled, could not cause aging! I can't imagine what research came up w that!

Suchet Singh Yadav
Suchet Singh Yadav 5pts

No Mr Teri , the latest research on water indicates that if you drink too much of water , you will age faster ?

Susan Jozwiak
Susan Jozwiak 5pts

You're correct Teri. For my body weigh I consume about 61.75 ozs a day. I ll drink more with 1 tsp ACV & 1 tsp honey or maple syrup (Preferably grade b ) in water for thirst quencher