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Best Exercises For Chronic Low Back Pain (Part 2)

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Say goodbye to back pain with the following floor core stabilization exercises that offer added benefits of strengthening and conditioning your core.

Last month, we reviewed studies that compared chronic low back pain (cLBP) exercisers to non-exercise control groups and examined how those in the exercise groups experienced significant improvements in pain and disability/function compared with those who remained inactive, regardless of the type of exercise.

We also reviewed a few popular Swiss or gym ball exercises. This month, we will introduce some core stabilizing exercises that can be done on the floor.

There are benefits to Swiss ball exercises like balance or proprioception stimulation. In fact, five minutes of ball exercises equals 35 minutes of floor exercising when focusing on balance or proprioception.

It is a well-known fact that as we age, we lose our “kinesthetic sense”, or balance skills, so incorporating balance into any exercise program is a good idea!

However, the “con” of Swiss ball exercises is convenience, as such a piece of equipment is less portable. We cannot easily travel with a gym ball, but we all have access to the floor regardless of our location.

Also, with exercises performed on the floor, you can achieve stronger muscle contractions due to greater stability.

Ideally, “mix” the two together! Also, include a 20-30 minute brisk walk for aerobic benefits!

Floor Core Stabilization Exercises For cLBP

Here are some great floor core stabilization exercises (try holding for 5-10 seconds, repeating 5-10 times, whatever is tolerated):

Pelvic Tilts

First, with the knees bent about 90° with your feet on the floor, flatten your low back against the floor by rocking your pelvis back.

Dead Bug

On your back with hips and knees both bent 90° (like sitting in a chair on your back), straighten out the right arm and left leg simultaneously and alternate sides “slowly”.

Superman

Lay on your stomach with your arm and legs stretched (like “Superman” flying). Raise one arm and the opposite leg (i.e. right arm/left leg) and slowly alternate between the other opposing pair.

Make it harder by raising both arms and legs at the same time! A pillow under the waist helps.

Bridge

Lay on your back with your knees bent. Lift the buttocks off the ground and push your heels into the floor. Do one leg at a time to make it more challenging.

Sit-Ups

There are three leg positions to make it progressively harder (knees bent/feet flat on floor, knees and hips both bent 90°, etc.).

Lift your breast bone towards the ceiling and alternate between coming straight up and left and right trunk twists.

Side Bridge (Plank)

If no shoulder problems exist, lay sideways propped up on an elbow and lift the hips off the floor to a straight body position.

Standing Squats

Try a quarter, half, or full squat (knee pain dependant) with or without hand weights and with or without a ball squeezed between the knees. Lunges can be substituted or added, if desired.

4-Point Quadruped

Kneeling on all fours, straighten out the right arm/left leg and alternate. At the same time, suck in your belly (“abdominal hollowing”) to facilitate the deep transverse abdominis and multifidus muscles.

Add a dynamic component by rotating the trunk and approximating your hand to the floor/opposite leg up in the air keeping the body in a straight line.

Dr. Blake Kalkstein DC, MS, CCSP, TPI, ART

While earning his D.C. degree, Dr. Blake worked as a chiropractic intern at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Hospital in Bethesda, MD where he had the privilege to work in the amputee rehabilitation center. Dr. Blake’s post graduate sports medicine internship with John’s Hopkins Sports Medicine orthopedic surgeons allowed him to observe all types of injuries. Guidance from Dr. John Wilckens, team orthopedist for the Baltimore Orioles and his internship supervisor, led Dr. Blake to better understand advanced orthopedic and sports injuries and ways to appropriately manage each condition.

Dr. Blake Kalkstein DC, MS, CCSP, TPI, ART

While earning his D.C. degree, Dr. Blake worked as a chiropractic intern at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Hospital in Bethesda, MD where he had the privilege to work in the amputee rehabilitation center. Dr. Blake’s post graduate sports medicine internship with John’s Hopkins Sports Medicine orthopedic surgeons allowed him to observe all types of injuries. Guidance from Dr. John Wilckens, team orthopedist for the Baltimore Orioles and his internship supervisor, led Dr. Blake to better understand advanced orthopedic and sports injuries and ways to appropriately manage each condition.

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