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Baby Born 9 Weeks After His Mom Is Declared “Clinically Dead”

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The bond between a mother and her unborn baby is beyond physical, but when it comes down to it, in the real-world, a lot of birth-control laws and decisions have made it awry, complex, or maybe even enabled rare medical techniques to save a baby’s life.1 2

Such was the case in October, when a 36-year-old woman in Milan, who was 23-weeks pregnant, suffered from a brain hemorrhage, but was kept alive using life-support to allow the baby to fully develop and be saved, on request from her family. After careful monitoring her vitals for the next nine weeks, a healthy baby was delivered through a cesarean section, in the 32nd week of the pregnancy.

Being incapacitated from making the decision herself, which is, whether she was willing to be an incubator for her child and then taken of life-support, a similar but trickier case happened in Ireland.

In this case, however, the family of this 17-weeks pregnant but comatose woman had been denied permission by authorities to take her off life-support, because it would kill the baby and abortion is illegal in Ireland, but for one condition. This condition was that an abortion is only allowed if the child or mother’s life were threatened, but neither was the case there.
So even the doctor’s hands were tied, as their job would be to save the baby’s life by any means necessary, even if the woman needed to be kept alive through life-support against her parent’s wishes.

The case was taken to the courts for a plea by the woman’s parents, to take their daughter off life-support, while the state represented the life of the fetus. A few months after, in December, the Irish court ruled in favor of the parent’s decision, and life-support was taken off thus ending the life of their daughter mother and her child.

Maybe it is enough to keep her bravery and memory alive, or maybe the legacy needed to be carried on through the birth of the newborn child if she passed. Hypothetically, what if the child was unwanted, as was the case in Ireland, would the state step-up to be its mother, since they are legally representing its need to survive?

Either way, the right to life should not consider just that of an unborn child, but of the mother’s or any human for that matter. Maybe the choice being in the hands of a family is wise, if the mother is unable to decide for herself, but as long as laws out there are one-sided there will always be a debate for what is right.

Such was the case in October, when a 36-year-old woman in Milan, who was 23-weeks pregnant, suffered from a brain hemorrhage, but was kept alive using life-support to allow the baby to fully develop and be saved, on request from her family. After careful monitoring her vitals for the next nine weeks, a healthy baby was delivered through a cesarean section, in the 32nd week of the pregnancy.

Being incapacitated from making the decision herself, which is, whether she was willing to be an incubator for her child and then taken of life-support, a similar but trickier case happened in Ireland.

In this case, however, the family of this 17-weeks pregnant but comatose woman had been denied permission by authorities to take her off life-support, because it would kill the baby and abortion is illegal in Ireland, but for one condition. This condition was that an abortion is only allowed if the child or mother’s life were threatened, but neither was the case there.
So even the doctor’s hands were tied, as their job would be to save the baby’s life by any means necessary, even if the woman needed to be kept alive through life-support against her parent’s wishes.

The case was taken to the courts for a plea by the woman’s parents, to take their daughter off life-support, while the state represented the life of the fetus. A few months after, in December, the Irish court ruled in favor of the parent’s decision, and life-support was taken off thus ending the life of their daughter mother and her child.

Maybe it is enough to keep her bravery and memory alive, or maybe the legacy needed to be carried on through the birth of the newborn child if she passed. Hypothetically, what if the child was unwanted, as was the case in Ireland, would the state step-up to be its mother, since they are legally representing its need to survive?

Either way, the right to life should not consider just that of an unborn child, but of the mother’s or any human for that matter. Maybe the choice being in the hands of a family is wise, if the mother is unable to decide for herself, but as long as laws out there are one-sided there will always be a debate for what is right.

References   [ + ]

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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