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Air-Pollution Kills Three Million People Every Year, Says WHO

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After conducting an in-depth study about the densely polluted areas of the world, the WHO released statistics and mapped to show the highest concentrations of air pollution by country. The studies show that 92% of the world’s population live in places which go over the safe limits of air pollution.1

Besides the obvious health hazards of heart disease, lung diseases, south-east Asia and the areas west of the Pacific see about 2 out of 3 deaths, with developing or poorer countries showing larger numbers and are worsening. In total, there are about three-million deaths occurring around the word due to air-pollution, every year.2

How Bad Air Pollutes and Kills the Body?

When we breathe in, we inhale a mix of elements in that air. It’s vital to remember that pure oxygen can actually kill us, but our body’s is clever enough to distribute and categorize the air we breathe in by what is needed be it oxygen, nitrogen and a little carbon dioxide. It then breaks it down and keeps some while eliminating the excess or unneeded through exhalation. However, if toxins are inhaled such as by smoking or passive smoking, even shisha some of the toxic particles especially ones smaller than 2.5 micro-meters in diameter can enter the blood and easily reach the brain, causing functional mayhem.

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Air-Pollution by Country

These statistics are high in number when looking at indoor air pollution alone. Indoor air pollution includes smoke from fireplaces or wood smoke, cooking accident fires, indoor smoking and the like, causing 1 out 9 deaths, mostly occurring in richer countries who have access and the abilities to better the quality of air.

However, when looking at the outdoor air pollution numbers, the country that topped the charts with the highest number of related deaths were Turkmenistan followed by countries such as Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Afghanistan, and Egypt within the top 10.

Breaking Down the Pollutants

Europe is said to have its air pollution comes from its heavy dependence on burning diesel fuels, farming chemicals such as ammonia and methane in pesticides, with the US, showing comparatively lower numbers.

India and China, being developing nations with over 1 billion people, also come within the top 10 highest-death toll related to air pollution. The main cause being industrial area such as smoke from factories, transport vehicles with low quality exhaust systems and less or no catalytic converter usage, low reliance on renewable sources of energy and bad waste management.

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More Air to this Study

With these eye-opening results, the WHO said that satellites connected to over 3000 monitoring stations have been put in place to analyze and assess the air pollution levels around the world.

However, in an alternative perspective, one should also consider the recent reasons for heavy and close to radioactive air-pollution numbers, occurring because of attacks on some countries. One example being the air strikes on Syria over the past few years and even in the last few months. But, this statistic does not seem to have been considered.

Shopping For Good Air?

Nevertheless, with no permanent solution in place to combat air pollution, some may see the top-polluted countries for a new cash-crop. A 27-year-old British man named Leo De Watts, is selling 580 ml jars of good-quality air for about $115 in China, while Canada is said to have also started selling breathe-easy air endeavors to its people too.

Besides breathing out of a jar in the near future, what are your solutions for this air-pollution shocker?

References   [ + ]

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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