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A Simple Exercise To Help Correct Forward Head Posture

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Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, and your knees slightly bent. Holding the weight with one hand (preferably, a light weight kettlebell), bring the weight up and behind your head; drop it slowly down your upper back. Lean back very slightly at the hips. Do not lean back by bending your back. Hold position for 20 sec. Switch arms, and repeat!

The Forward Head Posture exercise is a subtle, but powerful isometric exercise designed to correct and prevent S-shaped posture that can cause painful compression fractures in the spine.

Poor posture is often a sign of poor bone health. When your body weight is not distributed well due to spinal misalignment, your vertebrae end up taking on weight it can not support.

This leads to very painful (yet often not diagnosed) compression fractures in the spine. In the most extreme cases of forward head posture and typically the result of osteoporosis, people develop a hump on the upper back known as Dowager’s Hump.

Like most osteoporotic changes, it is often preventable with good eating, nutritional supplements (adequate calcium and vitamin D, throughout life, as part of a well-balanced diet, may reduce the risk of osteoporosis), exercises like this one, and a healthy lifestyle.

How To Fix Forward Head Posture

You will need a weight, preferably one with a handle like a kettlebell, and not too heavy. Err on the lighter side because you will be holding the weight single-handed.

  1. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Your knees should be slightly bent.
  2. Holding the weight with one hand, bring the weight up and behind your head; drop it slowly down your upper back. Weight should rest just slightly below your shoulder blades. Do not drop the weight too far down your back.
  3. Lean back very slightly at the hips. Do not lean back by bending your back.
  4. Hold position for 20 seconds, or as long as you can comfortably. You should feel a very slight burn in your neck, back, and core muscles.
  5. Switch arms, and repeat!

This exercise can be done several times a day to strengthen your neck and upper back muscles, and correct and prevent poor posture that may be caused by deteriorating bone health.

Charles T Price

Charles T. “Chad” Price, MD is Professor of Florida State University College of Medicine and was a practicing pediatric orthopedic surgeon for 34 years. Dr. Price is rated as One of America's Top Doctors. He received a B.S degree from Emory University in Atlanta where he was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa honorary scholastic society. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and completed his orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Florida. He is an author of over 70 scientific papers, 20 textbook chapters, and three books on topics including bone lengthening, fracture healing, artificial bone grafting and other research topics. In 2013 he became certified as a Sports Nutritionist by the American Sports and Fitness Association.

Charles T Price

Charles T. “Chad” Price, MD is Professor of Florida State University College of Medicine and was a practicing pediatric orthopedic surgeon for 34 years. Dr. Price is rated as One of America's Top Doctors. He received a B.S degree from Emory University in Atlanta where he was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa honorary scholastic society. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and completed his orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Florida. He is an author of over 70 scientific papers, 20 textbook chapters, and three books on topics including bone lengthening, fracture healing, artificial bone grafting and other research topics. In 2013 he became certified as a Sports Nutritionist by the American Sports and Fitness Association.

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