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7 Signs You Immediately Need More Magnesium

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Around 90% of us are deficient of magnesium. This mineral is responsible for over 300 biochemical reactions in the body, which includes blood pressure, metabolism, immune function and other things. These are the signs of magnesium deficiency.1

1. Calcification Of The Arteries

1-Calcification-of-the-Arteries

A dangerous sign of magnesium deficiency, which can lead to heart attacks and heart disease.

2. Muscle Spasms And Cramps

2-Muscle-Spasms-and-Cramps

This is the most common symptom of magnesium deficiency. It causes stiffening of muscle tissues, leading to cramps and spasms.

3. High Blood Pressure

3-High-Blood-Pressure

High blood pressure is one of the signs of magnesium deficiency. Magnesium helps to regulate your blood pressure.

4. Hormone Problems

4-Hormone-Problems

Magnesium controls the levels of estrogen or progesterone levels in a woman’s body. It can also cause issues in pregnancy. Low levels of magnesium can cause PMS, muscle cramps and preterm labor.

5. Sleep Problems

5-Sleep-Problems

Deficiency of magnesium can cause sleep issues. Magnesium is the ultimate relaxation mineral, and contributes to a restful sleep.

6. Low Energy

6-Low-Energy

Magnesium is required for the cells to create energy at the cellular level. Lack of magnesium can cause fatigue, low-energy, lack of drive, and other issues.

7. Bone Health

7-Bone-Health

Your bone health suffers the most when you’re low in magnesium. Magnesium is needed for Vitamin D to turn on the calcium absorption in your body.

References   [ + ]

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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