Quantcast
CONTINUE READING

6 Best And Worst Foods To Eat When You’re Sick

Bookmark

by

When you’re sick, your body needs special care. Not only in the form of extra rest but also in the foods you eat. Choosing foods carefully can help you to feel better faster. To make things a little simple for you, we bring to you a list of best and worst foods to eat when you’re sick.

1. Bananas

Bananas

Aside from their high vitamin content and energizing sugars, bananas are quite gentle on the stomach. If you’re suffering from a digestive-related illness, know bananas are a safe bet, along with rice, applesauce, and toast.
Worst foods

2. Dairy

Dairy

Dairy encourages the development of mucus. It’s probably not something you’re craving when you have a stomach bug either. If you’re searching for something cold to soothe your throat, opt for natural popsicles before hunkering down with a pint of Ben & Jerry’s cookie dough.

3. Fatty Foods

Fatty-foods

Fried chicken is not going to make you feel any better. Foods high in grease and fat often leave your stomach unsettled and can produce further inflammation. Adding to your bodily inflammation while you are sick just isn’t a smart idea.

4. Garlic

Garlic

As an antimicrobial and antibiotic, garlic is known to boost immunity. It also increases enzymes that help to detoxify the blood. Garlic not only helps ward off colds but also reduces the duration and severity of illness.

5. Hot Tea

Hot-Tea

Green tea is full of antioxidants, anti-viral and antibacterial properties. If caffeine isn’t your thing, chamomile tea elevates phenols, which are antioxidants that have been shown to possess antibacterial powers.

6. Sugary Foods

Sugary-foods

Sugar is acidic to the body. Avoid refined sugars and artificial sweeteners, which cause inflammation. Instead, opt for honey and maple syrup, which are full of beneficial minerals, or eat whole fruits, which balance the sugar intake with fiber.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

FURTHER READING