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6 Best And Worst Foods For Cellulite

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Certain nutrients worsen the appearance of cottage-cheese-like ski, even if you’re taking other measures to smooth it out. Genetics plays a major role in cellulite, there’s really no cure. However, losing weight and cutting back on unhealthy fats, sugar, and salt can make the appearance of cellulite less apparent. Read on to discover 6 best and worst foods for cellulite.

The Best Foods

1. Cilantro

cilantro

Fresh herbs like cilantro promote detoxification by helping to remove heavy metals from the body that tend to hide in fat cells. By reducing overall toxins in your body, you can help get rid of excess stored fat, which can help lessen the appearance of cellulite.

2. Parsley

parsley

This incredibly potent herb helps you get rid of the body of toxins. It also acts as a diuretic, which helps flush out your kidneys, preventing bloating and water retention.

3. Nuts

nuts

Nuts are a diet staple that help lessen the appearance of cellulite. Omega-3 fatty acids contribute to the health of the skin cell membrane, a two-fold protector of your body. Essential fatty acids can also help delay the skin’s aging by reducing the body’s natural production of inflammatory compounds.

The Worst Foods

4. Processed Meats and Cheeses

Processed-meats-and-cheeses

High sodium foods like deli meats, bacon and cheeses cause water retention. And that bloating and extra water weight can make cellulite more visible.

5. Canned Soup

canned-soup

Canned soup may be a simple dinner solution when you’re in a pinch, but most are loaded with salt. Salt can lead water retention and dehydration, making dimpling appear more pronounced than it is.

6. Pizza

pizza

Outside of genetics, there is a variety of things that can cause cellulite. One of the most common is poor blood flow. To keep your blood flowing freely, avoid foods high in artery-clogging saturated fat, like pizza.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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