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6 Best & Worst Foods For Your Brain

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To boost your brainpower and nourish your noggin for a longer, more productive life, load up on the following foods we have put together for you. Read on and find out the 6 best and worst foods for your brain.

1. Chamomile Tea

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During the colder months, your circadian rhythm may be thrown off by the decrease of natural light. Chamomile tea brings on better sleep. It also improves your cognitive functioning during your waking hours, too.

2. Black Beans

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In addition to being great inexpensive sources of protein, black beans contain a healthy dose of magnesium and folate. Beans are also good for your heart; a healthier blood flow means a healthier brain.

3. Whole Eggs

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Older people who suffer from vitamin D deficiency show faster rates of cognitive decline than those with adequate vitamin D levels. The good news is that getting your daily dose of D is as easy as cracking open some eggs.

4. Microwave Popcorn

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When air-popped, this snack has filling fiber and whole grains we love, but the microwaveable butter-flavored varieties are an entirely different story. A chemical that’s been found to break down the layer of cells that protects one of our most vital organs—the brain.

5. Tuna

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Bigeye, ahi, albacore and yellowfin tuna are all high in mercury, and consuming too much of the heavy metal can cause cognitive decline. To stay safe, incorporate other types of fish into your diet like anchovies, wild salmon, or trout, which boast many of the same brain-boosting benefits but don’t carry the risk of excess mercury exposure.

6. Soy Sauce

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Hypertension is often brought on by eating too many salt and sodium-packed foods like soy sauce, can restrict blood to the brain and negatively impair focus, organizational skills and memory. High salt intake can also cause electrolyte imbalance and mild dehydration, which can make it difficult to keep your head in the game.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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