Quantcast
CONTINUE READING

The 6 Best Foods For Vitamins and Minerals

Bookmark

by

When it comes to vitamins and minerals, you’re probably looking for the bottom line. How much do you need, and what foods have them? Would you want to get your nutrients the natural way? Here is a list of best foods for the following 6 vitamins and minerals.

1. Calcium

Calcium

Dairy products contain the highest amounts of naturally occurring calcium. Plain low-fat yogurt leads the pack with 415 mg (42% DV) per serving. Dark, leafy greens, such as kale are another natural source of calcium, which can also be found in fortified fruit juices and cereals.

2. Iron

Iron

There are two forms of dietary iron, heme iron and nonheme iron. Heme iron is found in animal foods such as red meat, fish, and poultry. Nonheme food is found in plant sources like lentils and beans. Chicken liver contains the most heme iron of any food, with 11 mg per serving, or 61% of your DV.

3. Magnesium

Magnesium

Wheat bran has the highest amount of magnesium per serving, but you have to eat unrefined grains to get the benefit. When the germ and bran are removed from wheat, the magnesium is also lost. Other good sources of the mineral include almonds, cashews, and green vegetables such as spinach.

4. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3-Fatty-Acids

Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is found in plant sources such as vegetable oil, green vegetables, nuts, and seeds, while eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are found in fatty fish. One cup of tuna salad contains about 8.5 grams of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

5. Potassium

Potassium

One medium-sized baked sweet potato contains nearly 700 mg of potassium. Tomato paste, beet greens, and regular potatoes are also good sources, as are red meat, chicken, and fish.

6. Vitamin-K

Vitamin-K

Green, leafy vegetables are the best source of vitamin K. Kale leads the pack with 1.1 mg per cup, followed by collard greens and spinach, and more exotic varieties like turnip, mustard, and beet greens.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

FURTHER READING