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5 Super-Fast Indoor Vegetables You Can Grow In About A Month

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Who said you need to be a farmer with huge patches of land to grow your own produce? With these plants that can grow easily inside your house, you can satisfy your inner gardener, and get fresh vegetables on your table in a month, every day.

1.Green Onions

1-Green-Onions

Count them in the easiest gardening projects that you’ve ever come across. Place the last one inch of the green onions in a jar of water. Fill the jar accordingly for three weeks. In order to extend their life, plant them into the soil, and water them regularly.

2.Radishes

2-Radishes

The best thing about them, they are ready to eat within few weeks of planting. Keep them in a 14 inch and wider container, and place them in a sunny window. Be sure to move them out of the sun on hot days, and water them regularly.

3.Herbs

3-Herbs

Basil, rosemary, mint, chives, and sage are easy to grow indoors. A herb plant should be in a window, getting at least 4 hours of direct sunlight each day. Water them regularly. You can pluck their leaves once they have enough to sustain themselves.

4.Tomato

4-Tomato

The best kinds of tomatoes to grow indoors are: Roma, Tiny Tim, Patio, Pixie, and Small Fry. You need to make sure that the plants are kept in a window with maximum sunlight. Keep turning the containers once a while to expose the whole plant to sunlight. Don’t forget to water them regularly.

5.Mandarin Oranges

The-Cucamelon-Is-The-Cutest-Summer-Food-You-Should-Be-Eating

Mandarin oranges, especially the Satsuna variety, can adapt well to being grown indoors. Take a well-drained 30-gallon container, fill it with soil, and sow four-five seeds into it. They need full day of sunlight year-round, and should be watered twice a week. Once a month, fertilize them with citrus-specific fertilizer.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

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