Quantcast
CONTINUE READING

These 10 Diseases Could Kill You In 24 Hours

Bookmark

by

Cancer, heart disease and HIV – all strike fear into the heart of patients handed the devastating diagnoses. They are chronic diseases, that progress over time and ultimately each can prove fatal. But, perhaps more terrifying, is existence of a number of diseases infinitely more potent and capable of killing within 24 hours. Here are 10 such diseases that can kill in one day.

#1

1-Necrotizing-Fasciitis

Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the deeper layers of skin and subcutaneous tissues which easily spreads across the fascial plane within the subcutaneous tissue. Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe disease of sudden onset that progresses rapidly.

#2

2-Meningococcal-Disease

Meningococcal disease carries a high mortality rate if untreated but is a vaccine-preventable disease. While best known as a cause of meningitis, widespread blood infection can result in sepsis, which is a more damaging and dangerous condition.

#3

3-Chagas-Disease

Chagas disease is a tropical parasitic disease spread mostly by insects known as kissing bugs. The symptoms change over the course of the infection. In the early stage, symptoms are typically either not present or mild, and may include fever, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, or local swelling at the site of the bite.

#4

4-Cerebrovascular-Disease

A cerebrovascular disease, is a vascular disease of the cerebral circulation. Arteries supplying oxygen to the brain are affected resulting in one of a number of cerebrovascular diseases. Most commonly this is a stroke or mini-stroke and sometimes can be a hemorrhagic stroke.

#5

5-MRSA

MRSA is a bacterium responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans because it’s resistant to some commonly used antibiotics. The symptoms of MRSA depend on where you’re infected. Most often, it causes mild infections on the skin, like sores or boils. But it can also cause more serious skin infections or infect surgical wounds, the bloodstream, the lungs, or the urinary tract.

#6

6-Cholera

Cholera is an infectious disease that causes severe watery diarrhea, which can lead to dehydration and even death if untreated. It is caused by eating food or drinking water contaminated with a bacterium called Vibrio cholerae.

#7

7-Enterovirus-D68

Enterovirus D68 is one of the more than 100 types of enteroviruses which can cause 10 – 15 million infections in the US each year. EV-D68 was first identified in California 1962 and until recently has caused very few infections in the United States. However, this strain of virus began an outbreak in the Midwest and has now reached coast-to-coast causing children respiratory problems.

#8

8-Bubonic-Plague

Bubonic plague is one of three types of bacterial infection caused by Yersinia pestis. Three to seven days after exposure to the bacteria flu like symptoms develop. This includes fever, headaches, and vomiting. Swollen and painful lymph nodes occur in the area closest to where the bacteria entered the skin. Occasionally the swollen lymph nodes may break open.

#9

9-Ebola

Signs and symptoms of Ebola typically start between two days and three weeks after contracting the virus with a fever, sore throat, muscular pain, and headaches. Then, vomiting, diarrhea and rash usually follow, along with decreased function of the liver and kidneys. At this time some people begin to bleed both internally and externally.

#10

10-Dengue-Fever

Dengue fever is a disease caused by a family of viruses that are transmitted by mosquitoes. Symptoms of dengue fever include severe joint and muscle pain, swollen lymph nodes, headache, fever, exhaustion, and rash. The presence of fever, rash, and headache is characteristic of dengue fever.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

CureJoy Editorial

The CureJoy Editorial team digs up credible information from multiple sources, both academic and experiential, to stitch a holistic health perspective on topics that pique our readers' interest.

FURTHER READING